Fish, Judith

Fish, Judith

Female 1749 - 1767  (17 years)

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  • Name Fish, Judith  [1
    Born 6 Oct 1749  Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Died 19 Sep 1767  New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried Lawrence Cemetery, Astoria, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I7081  Sackett
    Last Modified 12 Aug 2019 

    Father Fish, Nathaniel,   b. 18 Dec 1700, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1769, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Mother Berrien, Jane,   b. 29 Sep 1716, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Mar 1789, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Children 9 children 
     1. Fish, Elisabeth,   b. 4 Jan 1741, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1822  (Age 80 years)
     2. Fish, Mary,   b. 11 Feb 1743, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Nov 1757, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 14 years)
     3. Fish, Sarah,   b. 30 Apr 1745, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Sep 1765  (Age 20 years)
     4. Fish, John,   b. 1 Sep 1747, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Mar 1807, Tarrytown, Westchester, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     5. Fish, Judith,   b. 6 Oct 1749, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Sep 1767, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
     6. Fish, Peter,   b. 23 Nov 1751, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Nov 1810, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     7. Fish, Susannah,   d. Unknown
     8. Fish, Jane,   b. 7 Jan 1757, Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1834  (Age 76 years)
     9. Fish, Anna,   b. 1761,   d. 15 Nov 1821, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     
    Family ID F2652  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Lawrence, Jonathan,   b. 4 Oct 1737, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Sep 1812, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 16 Mar 1766 
    Children 
    +1. Lawrence, Jonathan,   b. 20 Jun 1767, New York City, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1850  (Age 82 years)
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2009 
    Family ID F2878  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Oct 1749 - Elmhurst, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Lawrence, Jonathan - 20 Jun 1767 - New York City, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 19 Sep 1767 - New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Lawrence Cemetery, Astoria, Queens, New York City, Queens County, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Village/Neighborhood/Community Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S2196] Historical genealogy of the Lawrence family : from their first landing in this country, 1635 to the present date, July 4th, 1858, Thomas Lawrence, (E. O. Jenkins), 95-102 (Reliability: 2), 11 Aug 2019.
      4 Jonathan Lawrence, the eighth son of John
      Lawrence and Patience Sacket, and great grandson of the first Thomas Lawrence, was born at Newtown, October 4, 1737, and early engaged in mercantile pursuits, visiting Europe and the West Indies under the direction, and in the employment of his eldest brother John, an eminent merchant of New York, and connecting himself afterwards in commercial affairs, as a partner of the house of Watson, Murray, and Lawrence. His own gains, the property left him by his said brother John, his portion of the estate of his brother Nathaniel, who died unmarried in the West Indies, and the patrimony derived from his parent, enabled him to retire from business, when about thirty-four years of age. He purchased a residence at Hurlgate, which had belonged to his great grandfather, Thomas Lawrence, (one of the time above named emigrating brothers,) intending to enjoy the ease which his pecuniary circumstances seemed to secure to him. The agitating questions between the mother country and her colonies, soon, however, forbade him to be inactive. In 1774 we find him a leading member of the political committees of Newtown ; his efforts and the influence of his brothers and relatives there, contributed to redeem the town from the ill-timed loyalty which distinguished most of the other portions of the country. In 1775 he was appointed a member of the provincial congress that met at New York. In 1776 he was again deputed to that body, and was afterwards elected to the convention of 1776-7, which formed the first constitution of this state. He had previously, in 1772, received the commission of captain in the provincial militia from the royal government ; and on the organization of the militia by the provincial congress in 1775, he w^as appointed major of the brigade, composed of the militia of Queens and Suffolk, of which Nathaniel Woodhull, Esq., was at the same time appointed general. He accompanied that brave officer in the expedition ordered by the convention in 1776, to prevent the supplies of Long Island falling into the hands of the invaders, and was probably saved from participating in the sad fate of his gallant commander, by having been dispatched by him to the convention at Harlem for further orders and having been thereupon sent by that body to General Washington to endeavor to obtain the additional force that had been promised, from the army at Brooklyn. During the time spent in these military operations, the battle of Long Island had been fought, much of the island had fallen under the controll of the enemy, and stragglers from their ranks had spread over it, in search of booty. All personal communication with his family being cut off, he could only trust to sending a letter secretly to advise them of his situation, and to direct their future course. The convention had adjourned from Harlaem, and sought a place of more safety for their deliberation, at Fishkill. His anxiety for his family was soon relieved by the presence of Mrs. Lawrence and his five children, accompanied by her sister-in-law, the wife of Abraham Riker, Esq., a captain in the American army, who afterwards died in camp, at Valley Forge, in 1778. The house had, at a late hour of the night, been visited by soldiers clamorous for food and plunder. Amusing them with refreshments in the kitchen, the ladies, by the aid of some female servants, conveyed the children (the oldest aged 9 years, and the youngest a little more than one year) from their beds to a boat at the river side, secured a few articles of clothing, and a small chest containing some money, plate and other valuables ; and embarking under the guidance of a faithful slave, crossed the river amid the darkness, unmolested, to Great Barn Island, leaving the house and the rest of the property to the mercy of the invaders. At daylight, they obtained a boat on the opposite side of the Island, and in safety reached Harlaem ; thus exchanging the plenty and comforts which a short time had blessed their home, for a state of poverty, and a more than seven years' exile.

      From this time Mr. Lawrence was the only attending
      member of the convention, from the county of Queens. On the 9th of May, 1777, he, Wilham Harper, and Matthew Cantine, were appointed commissioners to superintend the manufacture of gun flints, sulphur, lead, and salt ; the want of which was severely felt, and which could not then be obtained from abroad. In the course of his duties, he visited the Oneida Indians, procured the holding of a council of their chiefs, made satisfactory experiments on the waters of some of the salt springs, in the western part of the State, and contracted with the Indians for such salt as they might be able to produce. Some veins of excellent lead-ore were also discovered, but not in sufficient quantity to justify the working of them. The supplies afterwards obtained from France and elsewhere superseded the necessity of further efforts on the part of the commissioners.

      On the adoption of the state constitution in 1777,
      and the organization of the government it became impracticable for those parts of the southern district possessed by the enemy, to elect representatives to the legislature, and the convention deemed it their duty to appoint members of assembly for those counties ; they also chose Lewis Morris, Pierre Van Cortlandt, John Morin Scott, Jonathan Lawrence, William Floyd, William Smith, Isaac Roosevelt, John Jones, Philip Livingstone, to be senators of the district, till others could be elected in their places, as prescribed by the ordinances of the convention. Mr. Lawrence served under this appointment during the remainder of the war. In 1778 he was appointed a commissioner to execute a law for completing the five continental battalions, raised under the directions of this State, the duties of which office he successfully performed. On the arrival of Count d'Estaing's squadron off Sandy Hook, and in the hope of aiding an enterprise that might hasten the termination of the contest, Mr. Lawrence, with other volunteers, joined the fleet in the expedition against Rhode Island, embarking on the 20th of July from Black Point in New Jersey. He was assigned to the man-of-war L'Hector, of seventy-four guns Captain Mories. The wind was unfavorable ; and on their arrival off Newport, much delay ensued from the state of the weather and other circumstances ; and it, was not till the 6th of August, 1778, that they were enabled to get into the harbor, which was effected under an incessant fire from Brenton's Point, Fort Island, and other places. Most of the troops had been landed on the 9th, when the fleet of Lord Howe, anchoring off the harbor, a re-embarkation was ordered ; and the next day, the wind favoring, the French fleet cut their cables and stood out of port, exposed to an increased fire from the forts guarding the passage. Of the two men killed on board the Hector by this fire, one was dashed to pieces by a cannon ball at the side of Mr. Lawrence, who stood so near him as to be covered with his blood and the fragments of his body. Howe also cut his cables and proceeded to sea, and after much retreating on his part and manoeuvering for the weather gage, which continued until the 11th, the fleets had been brought into such a position, as to render an engagement apparently inevitable, when a storm ensued, which shattered and dispersed the hostile ships, and induced them respectively to seek repairs in the ports of Boston and New York. In consequence of this result. General Sullivan had to withdraw the American forces from Rhode Island ; and Mr. Lawrence, after an absence of about six weeks, reached his residence at Rhinebeck. In October following, he was chosen by the assembly to be the member of the council of appointment from the southern district, being the 2d appointment to that station under the constitution. His term of office expired in October, 1779. In February, 1780, Mr. Lawrence, Isaac Stoutenburg, of New York, and Stephen Ward of Westchester, were appointed commissioners of forfeitures for the southern district of New York, and on the 15th of August, was made one of the commissioners of sequestration for Dutchess county.

      On the 15th of June, and on the 9th of October, 1780, acts were passed by the legislature for raising a sum in specie, the better to secure the redemption of the bills of the new emission, then contemplated by the continental congress, whose former emission would command but one-fortieth part in gold or silver, of the nominal amount. Mr. Lawrence was, immediately after the passage of the last-mentioned act, placed at the head of the commission for the southern and middle districts, and John Lansing, Jun., (afterwards Chancellor of the State,) at the head of the commission. In the duties of this office, Mr. Lawrence was actively engaged in 1781. He was again a member of the council of appointment in 1782. In 1783, he opposed, though unsuccessfully, the passage of a bill declaring those described therein, who had adhered to the enemy, to have been aliens from the date of the Declaration of Independence. This bill was clearly in violation of the provisional treaty of peace, and would, if adopted as a law, have produced endless confusion and difficulty on Long Island and elsewhere, beggaring numerous families who had purchased lands bona fide, from persons thus declared to have had no title to them, or who had been prevented, more by their fears than their preferences, from joining the patriotic party. Mr. Lawrence resisted it with great zeal, but his views being opposed by Scott, Schuyler, and others of the ablest members of the Senate, he, Mr. Oothout and Smith, of Suffolk, stood alone on the final passage of the bill. It was carried with still greater unanimity in the assembly. Having passed both houses less than ten days before their adjournment, the council of revision exercised its prerogative of retaining the bill until the first day of the ensuing session in 1784, when a new election for senators and assemblymen having taken place, and men's minds had time to cool, the objections of the council were acquiesced in by the senate, where it had originated, with but one dissenting voice, and the law was consequently rejected.

      Peace being concluded in September, 1783, Mr. Lawrence was enabled to visit his long deserted home. He found his land stripped of its timber and fences, his stock and furniture destroyed or removed, and his house, having been occupied by British officers, greatly injured. During his long exile, he had not only exhausted those means which had been saved from the enemy, the gains which he had occasionally been enabled to make during its continuance, and numerous sums owing to him. but had also contracted debts, which the sale of his lands and other resources would little more than repay. Having now at the age of forty-seven, a large family to support and educate, he resolved to recommence business in the city of New York, and endeavor to repair his ruined fortune. Though nearly destitute of pecuniary means, he found himself in good credit ; yet his mercantile pursuits were not productive of all the benefit he had anticipated. The lands belonging to the State being offered for sale, he embarked somewhat largely in the purchase of them, and by resale from time to time, not only avoided the bankruptcy which befell other purchasers, but found himself in comfortable circumstances, with a considerable surplus of land unsold. His fortunes gradually improving until the time of his death, he was enabled to distribute a very considerable estate among his family. The result was aided by a well-regulated economy, equally removed from wastefulness and parsimony. Although he declined again to be returned to the legislature, he was not an indifferent spectator of passing events. He took an active part in the reelection of Governor George Clinton ; and when the Constitution had been ratified by the requisite number of States, he was anxious for the concurrence of this State ; from which period he acted uniformly with the republican party of the Union. His death occurred in the city of New York, at the age of seventy-five, on the 4th of September, 1812. He was twice married ; first, to Judith, daughter of Nathaniel Fish, who died at the age of eighteen years ; secondly, to Ruth, daughter of Andrew Riker, of Newtown, who survived him.

      4 As the children of Major Jonathan Lawrence (so
      called by his revolutionary associates,) have filled a considerable space in the political and social institutions of the country, I have deemed it due to the memory of such of them as have passed from amongst us, as well as to the only two survivors of that numerous and intelligent family, to extend their history to the present time.

      Researched by Ted Smith

    2. [S543] Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com) (Reliability: 2), 10 Feb 2019.
      Memorial ID 113149550
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/113149550

      Judith Fish Lawrence
      Birth 6 Oct 1749
      New York, USA
      Death 29 Sep 1767 (aged 17)
      New York, USA
      Burial
      Lawrence Cemetery
      Astoria, Queens County, New York, USA

      Researched by Ted Smith


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