Sackett, Sen. John C.

Sackett, Sen. John C.

Male 1944 - 2021  (76 years)

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  • Name Sackett, John C. 
    • John C. Sacket
    Title Sen. 
    Born 3 Jun 1944  Old Woman's Slough, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Gender Male 
    Residence 23 May 1969  Ruby, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Residence 27 Oct 1976  Galena, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Died 4 Mar 2021  Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8, 9
    Person ID I44702  Sackett | Descendants of Unknown Sackett & Elizabeth Gray
    Last Modified 13 Mar 2021 

    Father Sackett, James Clifton,   b. 27 Jun 1870, Carrollton Township, Fillmore County, Minnesota, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1957, Huslia, Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Mother Vent, Lucy,   b. Abt 1916, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1968  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Children
     1. Sackett, Sen. John C.,   b. 3 Jun 1944, Old Woman's Slough, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Mar 2021, Alaska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     
    Family ID F17942  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 3 Jun 1944 - Old Woman's Slough, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 23 May 1969 - Ruby, Alaska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 27 Oct 1976 - Galena, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Mar 2021 - Alaska, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Village/Neighborhood/Community Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Photos 3 Photos

  • Notes 
    • University of Alaska
      UA Journey
      University Regents

      1987-1988 John Sackett
      Ruby, Alaska

      John Sackett graduated from Sheldon Jackson High School as valedictorian in the class of 1963. While attending Sheldon Jackson, Sackett took an active part in various extracurricular activities on the campus, serving a term as study body president.

      After graduation he spent his first year in college at the University of Ohio. He then transfered to the University of Alaska system where he earned a bachelor's degree in accounting. After college he went into business. Sackett has served Alaskans in many capacities?vice president of the Fairbanks Native Association; past chairman of the Board of Directors of Doyon Ltd.; past member of the Board of Directors for Alaska International Industries and International Technology; and past member of the board of directors for MarkAir.

      In 1966, John was elected president of the Tanana Chief's Conference as the youngest Chief ever to hold this coveted position. In this office, he actively pursued the rights of Native people. At the age of twenty-one, he filed for the Alaska House of Representatives and was twenty-two when he made his formal debut into politics on the floor of the legislators representing the people of the Interior.

      After reappointment in 1982, Senator Sackett represented communities along the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers, extending from the Canadian Border to the Bering Sea. The district comprises some 88 villages and the city of Bethel.

      After two terms in the State House, he was elected to the Alaska Senate in 1972, and continued until 1986. In 1987 he became a lobbyist for the Yukon-Koyukuk and Lower Kuskokwim school districts and became a Regent to the University of Alaska filling the seat vacated by Grace Schaible.

      Sackett Hall
      The Kuskokwim Community College was established by the University of Alaska in July of 1972, and 83 students began classes in the fall of that year. Kuskokwim Community College is the largest remote site among the branch campuses of the College of Rural Alaska of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and is the only rural campus with a residential facility for students. Sackett Hall is a coed campus residence for full-time students in good academic standing.

      Each suite is furnished and provides personal space for four people with cable hook-up and phone connections. A central kitchen provides meals to residents and guests. A spacious common area is used for dining, lounging and recreational purposes; and coin operated laundry facilities are provided. Both the college and the library are within walking distance of the dorm.

      UAF Sites Named After John Sackett

      Sackett Hall
      Kuskokwim Campus (Bethel)

      Description: Built in 1984 the Sackett Hall is the only on-campus dormitory in rural Alaska. The building is a coed campus residence for full-time students in good academic standing.

      Researched by Ted Smith

      ------

      University of Alaska Fairbanks
      https://uaf.edu/centennial/uaf100/sackett.php

      John Sackett

      When John Sackett was just 4 years old, he listened to a man scream in pain for three days before dying. The man needed a catheter. None was available in their remote village, Cutoff, on the Koyukuk River in the late 1940s.

      "We had no airport, electricity, radio, television, telephone, running water or proper roads," Sackett recalled in a 2010 autobiographical essay.

      As a young man, he decided to change that. He was remarkably successful in doing so.

      At 21 in 1966, Sackett became the youngest person ever elected to the Alaska Legislature. He spent 18 of the next 20 years representing rural Alaska. In the mid-1960s, he also joined the leadership of Alaska Native organizations advocating for what became the 1971 land claim settlement with the federal government.

      In between, he earned a degree in accounting from UAF in 1972. The degree was part of his plan to become an effective advocate for rural Alaska, something he felt he hadn't been in his first four years in the Legislature.

      "I had to become a new person, one that my political colleagues would seek out and work with," he wrote. "Political power in the state legislature is something that is given or conferred upon you by others. To sustain it, you must be knowledgeable, trustworthy, fair and honorable. ? By 1972, I was ready."

      He returned to the Alaska Senate and set to work addressing the needs of rural Alaska. He also went to work as president of Doyon Ltd., the regional for-profit Alaska Native corporation created to accept part of the congressional land and cash settlement. He resigned from Doyon after a few years to focus on his legislative work.

      "During my years on the Senate Finance Committee, as either a member or chairman, I was able to appropriate hundreds of millions of dollars toward rural priorities," he recalled. "Although, as rural legislators, we were a minority, we worked cooperatively with every majority group on behalf of both rural and statewide priorities. In doing so, we also funded many urban priorities."

      Sackett, suffering from severe back pain, decided not to run for office in 1986. He continued working but outside the prominent public positions he had held in his youth. "I have had a wonderful life," he wrote in 2010. "I feel privileged to have lived in both the old ways and the modern world. I have achieved my goals."

      UAF presented Sackett with an honorary doctorate in 2013.

      Researched by Ted Smith

      ------

      Excerpt from message by Ted Smith to main@Sackett.groups.io, posted 11 Mar 2021:

      In addition to short written bios, Fairbanks Native Association has an audio interview with John posted at https://jukebox.uaf.edu/fna/htm/sackettpg.htm . I have only listed to the first few minutes where he describes his early life and education (but does not identify his parents).

      John's personal bio is posted at https://uaf.edu/dansrd/files/Sackett_NOVEMBER2010.pdf . In that file, he recounts that although he tells people that he was born in Cutoff, he actually was born at Old Woman?s Slough, the family's spring camp site, 35 miles away. That document is a very interesting read, recounting the challenges that people in his village faced, that his family faced, and naming a few family members (but still not naming his father).

      ------

      Email from Debra Cagwin (TSFA Member 587) to Ted Smith, 13 Mar 2021:

      I saw that you posted a link to an audio of an 1991 interview with John. I found a link on the Tanana Chiefs Conference Facebook page to 2014 video footage of an interview : https://fb.watch/4cvRwUW4xz/.

      He again speaks of his education a bit, but not his parents. I always hope to find photos (or video) whenever possible; thought this might be of interest.

      ------

      Here is another very informative video that describes the history of the Tanana Chief's Conference, the history of Alaskan natives, their relations with Russia and the USA, and how they worked to secure their land claims, etc. John Sackett is one of those who appear in the video, See https://www.tananachiefs.org/about/our-history/ for the link to the video.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1203] U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 1, (Ancestry.com) (Reliability: 2), 12 Jul 2017.
      Name: John C Sackett
      Birth Date: 1 Dec 1944
      Address: 27230 188th Ave SE, Kent, WA, 98042-5480 (1996)
      [3411 Wiley Post Loop, Anchorage, AK, 99517-2326 (1996)]
      [800 F St, Juneau, AK, 99801-1858]
      [1873 E Tudor Rd # 304, Anchorage, AK, 99507-1054 (1993)]
      [PO Box 20363 # 20363, Juneau, AK, 99802-0363]

      Researched by Ted Smith

    2. [S1738] Fairbanks Native Association, Project Jukebox (Reliability: 3), 12 Jul 2017.
      John Sackett, Biography
      http://jukebox.uaf.edu/fna/htm/sackettpg.htm

      John Sackett was born June 3, 1944 at spring camp, up the Huslia River, a tributary of the Koyukuk River. When he was six, he attended St. Mark's mission in Nenana for a year. Later he went to Sheldon Jackson High School in Sitka and graduated in 1963.

      His first college year was at Ohio University. He graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1972 with a major in Business Admistration (Accounting) and a minor in Political Science.

      In the mid-1960s he became involved with the Fairbanks Native Association and the Tanana Chiefs Conference. In 1966 when he was 21, he ran for the Alaska State House of Representatives. He is the youngest member ever elected to the Alaska State Legislature. He began an 18-year career in the House and Senate on all the Finance Committee and as a memeber of the Majority.

      For ten years, he served as the chairman and co-chair of the Finance Committees. He was one of the most powerful members of the legislature. He accomplished much for his constituents and the entire state through the formation of infrastructure and social programs and he endowed the educational, social, and economic development of rural Alaska.

      Senator Sackett also served as a president of Tanana Chiefs and in 1972 was the founding president and chairman of Doyon Ltd.

      The site has several audio files:

      John Sackett spoke with Bernice Joseph on 13 December 1991 in offices at the Doyon building in Fairbanks. John has been involved in Native affairs and state politics since he was in his early 20s, and the discussion ranged from the history of the FNA to the rise of Native political power in Alaska.

      This interview is housed on tape at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Rasmuson Library, Oral History Collection, Tape H92-05-11

      Background and Personal History
      Fairbanks Native Association - vice president/ Huslia/ Koyukuk/ St. Mark's Mission/ Territory of Alaska/ education/ Sheldon Jackson High School/ Ohio University/ Athens, Ohio/ University of Alaska|

      His involvement with the Fairbanks Native Association
      Click here for part 2 of this section
      Fairbanks/ Fairbanks Native Association - history/ Perdue, Ralph/ Carlo, Poldine/ Carlo, William/ Cook Inlet Native Association/ Alaska Native Brotherhood/ Southeast Alaska/ politics/ social services - lack of/ discrimination/ amenities - lack of/ Mount Edgecumbe boarding school/ education - regional schools/ land issues/ Tanana Chiefs Conference/ outsiders/ hunting - regulations/ traplines|

      His election to the Alaska State Legislature and efforts to help villages
      Fairbanks/ University of Alaska - Native movement/ Tanana Chiefs Conference/ Fairbanks Native Association/ Alaska House of Representatives - election/ Hensley, Willie/ Legislative Finance Committee - chairman/ Alaska Senate/ oil - royalties and taxes/ Prudhoe Bay/ airports/ health facilities/ roads/ schools|

      Revival of Tanana Chiefs Conference and formation of other Native organizations
      Click here for part 2 of this section
      Ketzler, Al/ Perdue, Ralph/ Tanana/ Tanana Chiefs Conference - president/ St. Matthew's Episcopal Church - meetings/ Tanana Chiefs Conference - funding/ Tanana Chiefs Conference - barriers/ Doyon/ Fairbanks Native Association/ volunteers/ Tanana Chiefs Conference - employment/ Fairbanks/ Bureau of Indian Affairs - contracts/ bureaucracy - dangers of/ villages - needs|

      Responsibility of Native corporations and state government to provide services
      Native corporations/ shareholders/ services/ state government|

      The role of Rampart Dam project in spurring the Native movement
      Rampart Dam/ Gruening, Ernest/ hydropower/ Native movement|

      How the Fairbanks Native Association potlatch encouraged Native pride
      Fairbanks Native Association - potlatch/ culture - pride/ discrimination/ dance - Stick Dance/ church - oppression/ traditional beliefs/ Alaskan attitudes - changes|

      Factors influencing Native political power
      Juneau/ land claims settlement - economics/ social structures/ Native politics/ legislative representation - loss/ Tanana Chiefs Conference/ fishing - quotas/ Kuskokwim River/ Bristol Bay/ Yukon River/ False Pass/ salmon - reduction/ Hensley, Willie/ Ferguson, Frank/ education/ village - improvements|

      Importance of avoiding complacency in Native affairs
      elders/ complacency/ militancy/ Fairbanks Native Association - services/ Tanana Chiefs Conference - services|

      Researched by Ted Smith

    3. [S1619] Newspapers.com (Reliability: 2), 3 May 2018.
      Faribanks Daily News-Miner (Fairbanks, Alaska), 27 Oct 1976, page 11

      Sackett Runs Unopposed

      Describes how State Senator John C. Sackett is running unopposed in his bid for re-election to represent the Interior area around Fairmanks. He was first elected to the legislature in 1967.

      "Sackett is also a member of the National Advisory Board to the federal Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Health Services."

      He "was born in Huslia and attended Sheldon Jackson High School where he was valedictorian of his graduating class in 1963. He attended Ohio University and the University of Alaska, graduating from UA in 1972 with a bachelor of arts degree in accounting. He lives in Galena."

      Researched by Ted Smith

    4. [S8] Life is good, John C. Sackett, (University of Alaska Fairbanks) (Reliability: 3), 11 Mar 2021.
      When asked, I usually say I was born in Cutoff, Alaska. It was a small Athabaskan village along the Koyukuk River in Interior Alaska. That is what I usually say. Actually, I was born at our "spring" (May and June) camp at "Old Woman's Slough" which is about 35 miles up the Huslia River. It runs into the Koyukuk River. My aunt, one of only two midwives, was there at that time and my mother (Lucy Sackett) went there for my birth. This was in June of 1944.

    5. [S1619] Newspapers.com (Reliability: 2), 3 May 2018.
      Faribanks Daily News-Miner (Fairbanks, Alaska), 23 May 1969, page 3

      Tanana Chiefs Elect Ketzler

      Describes "John Sackett of Ruby" as outgoing president of the Tanana Chiefs.

      Researched by Ted Smith

    6. [S1619] Newspapers.com (Reliability: 2), 3 May 2018.
      Faribanks Daily News-Miner (Fairbanks, Alaska), 27 Oct 1976, page 11

      Sackett Runs Unopposed

      Describes how State Senator John C. Sackett is running unopposed in his bid for re-election to represent the Interior area around Fairmanks. He was first elected to the legislature in 1967.

      "Sackett is also a member of the National Advisory Board to the federal Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Health Services."

      He "was born in Huslia and attended Sheldon Jackson High School where he was valedictorian of his graduating class in 1963. He attended Ohio Universityand the University of Alaska, graduating from UA in 1972 with a bachelor of arts degree in accounting. He lives in Galena."

      Researched by Ted Smith

    7. [S1018] Obituary (Reliability: 3), 11 Mar 2021.
      Alaska Native, former state lawmaker John Sackett dies at 76
      https://apnews.com/article/alaska-legislature-081e57c9632b47b5dd381f2b7a4b14d6

      Associated Press News, 6 Mar 2021

      ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) ? Alaska Native leader and former state lawmaker John Sackett has died. He was 76.

      Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy has ordered all flags to fly at half-staff on Monday in tribute.

      ?John Sackett was a valuable and effective advocate for Alaska Natives and our rural communities throughout his nearly 20-year tenure in the Legislature, as well as his extensive professional and community involvement. His legacy of service will forever be an integral piece of Alaska?s history,? Dunleavy said. ?Rose and I offer our sympathies to the Sackett family as they honor his memory.?

      His cause of death was not immediately released.

      Sackett was born in 1944 in the remote village of Cutoff, 35 miles (56 kilometers) up the Huslia River in Interior Alaska, Anchorage Daily News reported. He began his political career in 1967 in the state House of Representatives, when he was in his 20s.

      Sackett then spent 14 years in the state Senate, and four in the House representing Interior and Southwest Alaska, according to a profile by the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He also served as chair of the Senate Finance Committee.

      Sam Kito, former president of the Alaska Federation of Natives, said on Friday that Sackett?s work in the Legislature was only part of his legacy. He also helped establish Doyon Ltd., the Alaska Native regional corporation, in the 1970s.

      Sackett was the first president of Doyon and Kito served as executive vice president, he said. Sackett was also former president of the Tanana Chiefs Conference, providing services to dozens of tribes.

      Kito also said Sackett was an influential leader in the fight for the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which established Alaska Natives claims to land in the state.

      Doyon, Ltd. said on its Facebook page in 2019 that Sackett continued to attend meetings until late in life.

      Researched by Ted Smith

    8. [S1018] Obituary (Reliability: 3), 11 Mar 2021.
      Longtime Alaska lawmaker and Native leader John Sackett has died at age 76, by Alex DeMarban

      https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/rural-alaska/2021/03/05/longtime-alaska-lawmaker-and-native-leader-john-sackett-has-died-at-age-76/

      Alaska Daily News, March 6, 2021

      Former longtime Alaska lawmaker and Alaska Native leader John Sackett has died. He was 76.

      Sackett, born in 1944 at a spring hunting camp along the Huslia River in the Interior, rose to become a prominent lawmaker during a career that began in the state House of Representatives in 1967, when Sackett was in his early 20s.



      Sackett strove to make a difference in rural Alaska, after childhood experiences in the remote village of Cutoff highlighted village shortcomings in medical, transportation and other services, according to a profile by the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

      By the time his legislative career ended in 1986, Sackett had spent 14 years in the state Senate and four in the House representing Interior and Southwest Alaska, and he?d served as Senate Finance Committee chair, according to the UAF profile.

      His work in the Legislature was only part of Sackett?s legacy, said Sam Kito, a former president of the Alaska Federation of Natives, on Friday.

      Sackett also helped establish Doyon Ltd., the Alaska Native regional corporation, in the early 1970s, Kito said. Sackett was the first president of Doyon, and Kito served as executive vice president. Sackett was also former president of the Tanana Chiefs Conference, providing services to dozens of Interior tribes.


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      Former longtime Alaska lawmaker and Alaska Native leader John Sackett has died. He was 76.

      Sackett, born in 1944 at a spring hunting camp along the Huslia River in the Interior, rose to become a prominent lawmaker during a career that began in the state House of Representatives in 1967, when Sackett was in his early 20s.
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      Sackett strove to make a difference in rural Alaska, after childhood experiences in the remote village of Cutoff highlighted village shortcomings in medical, transportation and other services, according to a profile by the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

      By the time his legislative career ended in 1986, Sackett had spent 14 years in the state Senate and four in the House representing Interior and Southwest Alaska, and he?d served as Senate Finance Committee chair, according to the UAF profile.

      His work in the Legislature was only part of Sackett?s legacy, said Sam Kito, a former president of the Alaska Federation of Natives, on Friday.

      Sackett also helped establish Doyon Ltd., the Alaska Native regional corporation, in the early 1970s, Kito said. Sackett was the first president of Doyon, and Kito served as executive vice president. Sackett was also former president of the Tanana Chiefs Conference, providing services to dozens of Interior tribes.

      In the mid-1960s, Sackett was an influential Native leader in the fight for the sweeping land settlement agreement for Alaska Natives, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, Kito said.

      Sackett continued to attend Doyon meetings until late in life, the Doyon corporation wrote on its Facebook page in late 2019.

      Gov. Mike Dunleavy has ordered U.S. flags and Alaska state flags to fly at half-staff on Monday in remembrance of Sackett.

      Researched by Ted Smith

    9. [S1018] Obituary (Reliability: 3), 11 Mar 2021.
      John C. Sackett: Champion of rural Alaska, by Meghan Sullivan
      https://indiancountrytoday.com/obituaries/john-c-sackett-champion-of-rural-alaska

      Indian Country Today, 8 Mar 2021

      Alaska is mourning John C. Sackett, a former legislative powerhouse, who died March 3 at the age of 76.

      During Alaska?s oil boom, the Athabascan leader made sure a share of the wealth went to rural Alaska, which is predominantly Alaska Native. In the 1980s, the state of Alaska was transformed by oil development on the North Slope. Fueled by taxes and oil royalties, Alaska?s state budget skyrocketed. As one economist put it, ?The state appeared to be rich beyond the wildest dreams of the most fervent boomers.?

      Sackett served in the Alaska state House and Senate for nearly 20 years beginning in 1967 and as a member of finance committees for 18 years. For 10 of those years, he achieved many of his aims while serving as the savvy chair and co-chair of the powerful finance committees.

      Together with a handful of other legislators who shared his interests, he steered hundreds of millions of dollars to rural Alaska. They created infrastructure that immeasurably raised the quality of life of rural residents, and that acted as a catalyst for economic growth in the region.

      In a 1991 interview with Bernice Joseph, Sackett said, "Nothing is ever given to you ? in state government at least, and I'm an expert in that field -- because it is a necessary right. You have to fight for everything, every service and every program. And it's not going to be given to you because it's right, as it should be. I don't care how basic the need is.

      "We learned that, at a very early stage ... that we just had to fight for every educational program, every grant for water and sewer, community hall, electricity, roads, water, everything we have to work for, nothing was ever given to us at all," he explained.

      Sackett was born at Cutoff, a village on the Koyukuk River in Interior Alaska, on June 3, 1944. He graduated from Sheldon Jackson High School as valedictorian in 1963, and went on to graduate from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1972 with a major in Accounting and a minor in Political Science.

      "John was a hard worker, very bright and funny," said Sackett's friend and colleague, Emil Notti, Athabascan. "He was one of the great leaders, and a tough negotiator with the oil companies. He was very brave."

      Sackett began his political career at the age of 22, when he became the youngest person ever elected to the Alaska Legislature, and the first Athabascan to represent rural Alaska in the state legislature. He spent the following decades serving Alaska in multiple roles, including vice president of the Fairbanks Native Association, and president of the regional non-profit Tanana Chiefs Conference. He worked in the House of Representatives from 1967-1970 and the Senate from 1973-1986.

      Sackett brought a sharp business mindset to negotiations as he helped shape the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which transferred title to 44 million acres of land and $1 billion to for-profit regional Native corporations. In 1972, he was elected as the first president and chairman of Doyon, the Alaska Native corporation for the state's Interior.

      "All of us here at Doyon, Limited are deeply saddened to hear about the passing of our first president, John Sackett of Huslia. Sackett was a trailblazer for Doyon and our shareholders. We extend our gratitude for his leadership and vision that brought Doyon to where it is today," said Doyon's current President Aaron Schutt, Athabascan.

      Throughout his lifetime, Sackett continuously emphasized how important the land and subsistence practices were to the state's Indigenous communities.

      "We have, I feel, a very religious feeling toward the land and everything that comes from the land," Sackett explained in a 1970 hearing before the House Subcommittee on Indian Affairs.

      "He loved going up on the Yukon in the summertime -- going back to his roots, putting up fish and drying them," Notti said.

      Even after he retired, Sackett still would attend Doyon meetings, explained Doyon board member Jennifer Fate, Koyukon Athabascan.

      "He wanted our businesses to succeed, and still cared about that up until the last years of his life," she said. She recalls Sackett coming over for dinner when she was younger, discussing his dreams for the community with Fate's parents. He would spend his life working to make sure those dreams became a reality.

      "I have had a wonderful life," Sackett wrote in an autobiographical essay in 2010. "I feel privileged to have lived in both the old ways and the modern world. I have achieved my goals."

      On Thursday, Governor Mike Dunleavy ordered that U.S. flags and Alaska state flags fly at half-staff on Monday, in honor of his passing.

      "John Sackett was a valuable and effective advocate for Alaska Natives and our rural communities throughout his nearly 20-year tenure in the Legislature, as well as his extensive professional and community involvement," said Governor Dunleavy in a press release. "His legacy of service will forever be an integral piece of Alaska's history."

      In a Facebook post, his family said their beloved brother, uncle and friend "went without pain during a heart procedure" and more details would be forthcoming.

      Researched by Ted Smith


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