Beach, Daniel

Beach, Daniel

Male 1785 - 1861  (76 years)

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  • Name Beach, Daniel 
    Born 16 Mar 1785  Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 May 1861  Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I3595  Sackett
    Last Modified 25 May 2019 

    Father Beach, Reuben,   b. 4 Dec 1757, Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jul 1844, Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Mother Kimball, Hannah,   b. 25 Aug 1766,   d. Unknown 
    Married 5 Sep 1784  [2
    Children
     1. Beach, Daniel,   b. 16 Mar 1785, Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 May 1861, Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     
    Family ID F1520  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sackett, Lorinda,   b. 17 Dec 1789, Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1856, Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Married 1 Jan 1810  Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Beach, Cyrus S.,   b. 23 Sep 1810, Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     2. Beach, Reuben Kimball,   b. 4 Oct 1813, Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     3. Beach, Cordelia M.,   b. 7 Oct 1814, Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     4. Beach, Harriet L.,   b. 6 Aug 1816, Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     5. Beach, Daniel B.,   b. 13 May 1820, Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     6. Beach, Wakeman J.,   b. 11 Jan 1825, Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     7. Beach, William C.,   b. 8 Nov 1827, Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
    Last Modified 25 May 2019 
    Family ID F1519  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 16 Mar 1785 - Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1 Jan 1810 - Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Cyrus S. - 23 Sep 1810 - Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Reuben Kimball - 4 Oct 1813 - Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Cordelia M. - 7 Oct 1814 - Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Harriet L. - 6 Aug 1816 - Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Daniel B. - 13 May 1820 - Tallmadge, Summit County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, Wakeman J. - 11 Jan 1825 - Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Beach, William C. - 8 Nov 1827 - Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 May 1861 - Ruggles, Ashland County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Village/Neighborhood/Community Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Notes 
    • [ASHLAND COUNTY; THE PIONEERS; AND SKETCHES OF SOME OF THE MOST NOTED INDIANS
      RESIDING ON THE BRANCHES OF MOHICAN, FROM 1808 TO 1824.]
      http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohacogs/indextwo.html
      DANIEL BEACH

      Was born in Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, March 16, 1785. In 1805 he came on foot to Canfield, Mahoning County, Ohio, and worked one year, then returned and married Lorinda Sacket, January 1, 1810. He purchased two hundred acres of wild land in what is now Summit county, Ohio, to which he removed in 1811, coming the entire route with a yoke of oxen and one horse. In 1812 he was drafted in the military service and served near Fort Croghan six months. In 1823 he disposed of his farm and accompanied Bradord Sturtevant in search of a new home to Ruggles township, Huron, now Ashland county, and purchased, of Jessup & Wakeman, of Connecticut, one mile square of land in section three, he taking the west and smallest part. He returned, and in July 1823, removed with his wife and five children--Cyrus, Reuben, Cordelia, Harriet, and Daniel, to his new home in the forest, about one mile west of what is now known as the corners. The paths in the forest were narrow, and required quite an effort to get over by teams. He had two yoke of oxen to haul his goods. He encamped one night in Medina County, and one night at Sullivan center. A man--Mr. John Soles--piloted him thence by way of New London. He encamped one night on the route in what is now Troy, and again at New London, and was just one week in reaching his forest home. Their first supper was cooked at the fire of a deserted Indian camp on the premises. The forest was dense, and it required years of unremitting toil to prepare the lands for culture. Mr. Beach was accompanied in his removal by Eleazer Sacket, a brother-in-law. He built a pole cabin, ten by fifteen feet, in which he resided until he built a log cabin. By fall he had cleared five acres, which he put in wheat. Other pioneers began to select lands, and Mr. Beach's cabin was frequently visited. In the winter of 1824 he hired hands, and cleared the timber from one hundred acres. In the spring he and Bradford Sturtevant returned to Tallmadge and purchased apple-trees for new orchards, some of which yet bear fruit. Mr. Beach, by industry and economy, accumulated a handsome property. In 1854 he divided his homestead between his two sons, Wakeman and William, and removed to Kent County, Michigan. Mrs. Beach died on a visit to Ruggles, at the residence of her son, Cyrus Beach, in November 1856. Mr. Beach subsequently married Mrs. Frances Peck, widow of Tylor Peck. He died at his residence in Ruggles in May 1862. He was remarkable for his habits of industry and enterprise. He was exact and careful in all his business transactions, and his integrity was never questioned. His children were Cyrus S., Reuben K., Harriet I., married to Rollin Curtiss, Daniel, deceased, Wakeman J., and Cordelia M., married to Isaac Cowell. Most of the family reside within Ruggles Township, and are noted as farmers and stock growers. Wakeman Beach, born January 11,1825, is believed to have been the first child born within the township. He resides on the old homestead west of the corners. I am indebted to him for the foregoing sketch.

      contributed by
      Russ Shopbell
      rshop@zoominternet.net

      transcribed by
      Penny Hanes
      PHanes1368@aol.com
      --------
      Bronson, Vol II, p. 113-114:
      Daniel Beach
      Daniel Beach was the eldest child of Reuben and Hannah (Kimball) Beach (For a sketch of these pioneers the reader is refered to Vol 1st of Historical Collections, Page 102) And was born in Warren, Conn, March 16th 1785. He, like others of that day had a rather limited education; but his father being one of the prosperous farmers of his day, and industrious and economical habits absolutely necessary, in order to be successful in business. Daniel Beach, appeared to have these requisite qualifications by inheritance; for he was quick and active of good judgement and decission, somewhat impulsive, and was a man that would express his opinion, in a manner to create unpleasant feelings sometimes. He was a good neighbor always ready to help the needy, and the afflicted, he identified himself with the interests of the town, and of schools, and in society. Although he was not a professor of religion, yet he was a regular attendant, on public worship on the Sabbath; and always helped support the Gospel ministrations, in the Cong Church and society. He was a liberal subscriber, when the first efforts were made to erect the first Cong'l Meeting House in Tallmadge, and was one of the contestants to get the first stick of hewing timber on the ground where it was to be used on the 24th day of Dec 1821. Mr Daniel Beach was married to Lorinda the 2nd daughter of Salmon and Mercy M. Sackett, on the 1st day of Jan 1810. When his father in law Dea Salmon Sackett, had resolved to dispose of his farm in Warren, for land in Tallmadge, in part pay and Dea Sackett, having visited the country, his description of the fertility of the soil, it had an inducement on Mr. Beaches mind, to think whether the rocky hills of his native town, or the soil of Tallmadge, with its heavy growth of timber, was preferable; his father was disposed to purchase a farm of Co. Tallmadge, without any improvement and help him to outfit of such things

      114

      as he would need in the dense forests of the Western Reserve. He and his wife and heir first born, Cyrus Beach, who was the first grand child of Dea and Mrs. Sackett, left Conn in company and all arrived safe in Tallmadge, the first Monday of July 1811. He selected Lot 5 of Tract 11 of ___ acres. Daniel Beach was without doubt the 4th settler on Tract 11. He made good use of his time and energies, his father paid for the farm he had selected, it was an unbroken forest of heavy timber, and it was to be subdued, and the wilderness to become a fruitful field. Mr. and Mrs Beach were the ones to battle with the stern realities of pioneer life.
      He selected a place by a spring and built his log house near the present residence of Mr James Chamberlin, (1877) and in 12 years had a fine farm fenced, an orchard set out and in 1819 built the third frame barn on the Tract.
      In the early spring of 1823, he sold this farm to Garry Treat of Orange, Conn. Br. Beach, bought a tract of land in Ruggles, Huron Co., O, on the west side of the town west of the Vermillion River; he being the first settler. He and his family arrived in Ruggles Aug 2nd 1823. the 2nd family which was Mr. Bradford Sturtevant arrived in Sept 1823, which comprized all the white population in these two families in Ruggles. His son Wakeman J Beach, was the first white child born in Ruggles, he was born Jan 11th 1825

      Children of Daniel and Lorinda S. Beach.
      1st Cyrus S., born in Warren, Conn; Sept 23rd 1810.
      2nd Reuben Kimball, born in Tallmadge; Oct 4th 1812.
      3rd Cordelia M., born in Tallmadge; Oct 7th 1814.
      4th Harriett L., born in Tallmadge; Aug 6th 1816.
      5th Daniel B., born in Tallmadge; May 13th 1820
      6th Wakeman J., born in Ruggles; Jan 11th 1825.
      7th William C[?], born in Ruggles; Nov 8th 1827.

      Daniel Beach married for his 2nd wife Mrs Frances B Taylor ^Peck. Died Feb 23rd 1875 aged 78. Daniel Beach died May 21st 1862 aged 77. Mrs Lorinda S. Beach died Nov 10th 1856 aged 67. Daniel B. Beach died Nov 24th 1854 aged 34.
      Mr Beach, when he went to Ruggles was 38 years old and he entered into business with energy built a saw and grist mill on the Vermillion River, was unfortunate but by the aid of his sons he passed through life with comfort and enjoyment.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1792] Charles Cook Bronson's History of Tallmadge and the Western Reserve 1804-1886, Charles C. Bronson, (Akron-Summit County Public Library) (Reliability: 2), 25 May 2019.
      p. 77

      1st - Daniel, born in Warren Ct., March 16th, 1785 - He married Lorinda, daughter of Salmon and Mercy (Curtiss) Sackett Jan. lst, 1810 and died in Ruggles, Ashland Co. 0. May 23rd, 1861 aged 76

    2. [S1792] Charles Cook Bronson's History of Tallmadge and the Western Reserve 1804-1886, Charles C. Bronson, (Akron-Summit County Public Library) (Reliability: 2), 25 May 2019.
      p. 73-77

      Mr. Reuben Beach was the settler on Tract 7 in 1815, Mr. Mr. (sic) Beach was the son of Daniel and Hannah (Burton) Beach and was born in Stratford, Fairfield County, Conn., Dec. 4th, 1757.

      I am indebted to the family of the late Reuben B. Beach for many important items of interest respecting Mr. Beach. And also to the proprietors of the Cleveland Herald, for their kindnesses in letting the writer have access to the Volume of the Herald, which contained the obituary of Mr. Beach, which I copied.

      OBITUARY

      Another patriot of the RevolaCion defeated. Died at Tallmadge Summit Co., Ohio, on the morning of the Fourth of July, 1844, our nations birthday, Mr. Reuben Beach in the 87th years of his age.

      He was of Scotch Ancestry. His Father Daniel Beach was killed in t he French and Indian War, July 28th, 1758, some four and a half years after marriage. His mother married the second time a Mr. David Mallory, who lived at Kent, Conn. and died a few years after. A worthy and useful man.

      His mother lived with him after Mr. Mallorys death, she died Feb. 14th, 1814 aged 84 years. Reuben the subject of this notice being left fatherless he was put out from 5 to 14 years of age to three several persons two at least dying, leaving him homeless. At 14 he went as an apprentice to learn the shoemakers trade, that not agreeing with his health, he enlisted in the Continental Army, in the spring of 1775, for six months, went to the North and was stationed at Skeensborough (now Whitehall, N. Y.). An only and elder brother who went to the taking of Quebec and returned he died in Camp probably within 100 rods of Reuben though the facts of his brothers death was unknown to him, until his return home. His mother having married again, and his only brother being now dead, he enlisted into the army during the war in the spring of 1777. He entered the third Connecticut Regiment in March 1777.

      He received a Serjeants Warrant in July 1780. He was discharged on the 9th of June, 1783, and received a badge of Merit for "Six years faithful service". His first engagements was at Flatbush on Long Island. The second was near Philadelphia; then at Stoney Point under Gen. Wayne; next at the seige of Yorktown under Gen LaFayette. Being large active and of portly form, capable of great physical effort and endurance, he was one of the first to be on all special occasions. He returned home in June 1783, at the close of the war; regularly discharged at 25 years of age pennyless and alone. His Father (sic) having been cut down under farless exposure and his only brother laid in the grave in his first campaign, while he having faithfully served his country during her whole revolutionary struggle, shunning no danger, shrinking from no toils or deprivations having fought her battles while hundreds were slain by his side, and having with others won her victory, his mind became deeply and will overrule direct and control all events, and n ow with the
      greatest solemnity of feeling and determination of purpose, he vowed to God that if he would bestow a sufficiency of this worlds goods to meet his actual wants and supply the necessities of a family, he would ever be content. This his vow was faithfully kept, both in its spirit and letter. The same kind providence that guided and defended him amid all the dangers of the battlefield, was extended over him during his retirement to private life. His parents were agricuturists. On the 5th of Sept. 1784 he was married to Miss Hannah Kimball, a worthy and beloved helpmeet (sic), who died but a few years before him, leaving four children now in active life, to revere her memory. Neither of them possessed property, nor had they enjoyed any considerable advantage for education but both possessed an invaluable inheritance, native vigor, both of mind and body peculiar to the age that gave them birth. They also possessed Puritan firmness of principle and perseverance of purpose, and set out in life determined to gain an honest and an honorable livelyhood (sic), not desirous of wealth or fame. They settled in Warren, Litchfield County, Connecticut, a few years of untiring labor found them in possession of a farm of some $1000 value, and all the necessaries of life around them in full enjoyment. By perservering (sic) industry and frugality besides providing for the wants of a rising family, the year of his removal to Tallmadge (1815) found him worth $4,500 unincumbered (sic) in ready means. This he wisely expended in making provision for the wants of his children now advancing to active life, and to meet the necessities of declining age, so that it has ever been eminently true in regard to temporal matters, that himself and family, "have wanted no good thing". That providence in which he trusted having fulfilled his desires he is found faithful to his vow.

      No external events are permitted to distract him. He is almost a stranger to disapointments. His plans are laid and his anticipation formed, in full of contingincies, and rarely indeed did results fall short of his expectations. He moved cautiously but firmly through life. Rarely did he feel embarasment. His precuniary obligations was ever promptly met. As a man he was strictly honest and honorable. As a neighbor kind and obliging. He was no slanderer nor even tattled. Home was the world to him, at least it that he desired. Confiding as he did in God as a rightful providential Governor, he was early led to accept Jesus Christ as his Savior.

      He made a public profession of religion, by uniting with the Baptist Church in Warren Ct. in 1785. But it was not until1 1800, the year of Gods gracious displays of mercy and grace, in the great and extensive revivals in New England, under the labors of Jonathan Edwards the Younger, that his soul became deeplt (sic) enlisted in religion. In this year he united with the Cong. Church in Warren, Ct. These revivals which opened with the 19th Century opened a new and more glorious era to the Church in breathing upon her a missionary spirit, breathed upon him a spirit of more entire consecration.

      More efficient systems of benevolence, date their commencement from these revivals - systems that have already wrought wonders in spreading the Gospel espeicially (sic) in making this great Western "Wilderness to bud and blossom as the rose".

      To these objects Mr. Beach from the first formation of the Conn Missionary Society to his death, contributed liberally. Other objects of public benefit received no inconsiderable portion of his substances. This is expeicially (sic) true in refference to the erection of houses of public worship, academies and school houses, and in his subscriptions for the support of the Gospel Ministry. It is true that until1 age and infirmities induced him to relinquish the active cares and duties of life, he held on to the world with a firm tenure. This period having arrived, he cheerfully resigned all worldly anxiety.

      And now in connexion with an extensive revival in Tallmadge the power of personal religion, more fully manifests itself, while his intelectual vigor remained unimpared by age and even tunill (sic) his hopes grow brighter and brighter, his confidence in the Saviour, stronger and stronger. Though never particularly active in public, and for several years of practical piety, and deep devotion from private interviews, he went down to the grave as a "Shock of corn fully ripe ripe in its season". His end was eminently peaceful. Often did he long to be "absent from the body to be present with the Lord". His prayer for years was "Now lettest thy servant depart in peace". And dying was but going home.

      Copied Feb. 1868 C. C. Bronson

      Mr. Beach was well aware that there were other localities that were preferable to the rocky hard soil of Warren and the surrounding towns. But his aged Mother was dependant upon him for support, and he was not the one to deprive her of the comforts and the associations of her early life.

      His eldest son came to Ohio and settled in Tallmadge in 1181 (sic; prob. 1814, if his moter's death date is correct), and his Mother as we have seen died the same year. Emigration at this time was setting strong to the west, Mr. Beach disposed
      of his farm and as his eldest daughter had already settled in Tallmadge, this seemed to be the place to locate himself. and having the means and disposition to assist his family, he bought Lots 2 and 10 in Tract 7 of Benj. Tallmadge of Litchfield, and also Lot 9 of Eph. Starr or Goshen and Lot 5 in Tract 11 of Col. Tallmadge. The amount of land purchased by Ensign Survey was about 591 acres. The lot in Tract 11 he gave to his son Daniel, Lot 2 he gave to Mr. and Mrs. Carter, and he retained for his own home and his second son Reuben Burton Beach, Lots 9 and 10, being 236 78/100. His arrangements being made he left Conn arriving in Tallmadge in May 1815.

      He built his log house at the foot of the hill west of the present residence of Francis D. Alling, near a large spring. Mr. Beach had the means to hire land cleared, and by this means in 4 or 5 years had 50 or 60 acres of land cleared, and had set out an orchard. In 1819, he built a barn, and in 1821 he built the house now owned and occupied by F. D. Alling. Mr. Beach finding the infirmities of age, creeping on him, he gave up the cares and responsibilities of business, to his son Burton. He was of good judgement, shrewd, a large amount of foresight, a close dealer and prompt in all his dealings with his fellow men, in fact his word was as good as his bond, and by his industry and frugality, and with Mrs. Beach to help htey (sic) made the amount of property in their possession, and was in his day considered a rich man. About 1841, the writer called on Mr. Beach and spent 2 or 3 hours, in conversation with him. Upon calling his mind to the scenes of the revolution, like other old vetrans of that day, it seemed to rekindle the patriotic fire. And he was ready to rehearse to me the scenes of those eventful days. He told me how he felt when Gen. Wayne addressed them, before the attack on Stoney Point. He remarked that they were paraded in line. And the Gen and his staff, took their position in front and Gen Wayne said there is a secret expedition planned, and we want to call for vollunteers it is no place for cowards. Now I wish to know who will volunteer, those men who do not wish to go will step three paces in the rear. Mr. Beach said my heart sank within him, I did not want to go, neither did I want to be called a coward. All the men stood still in the line where he was, but evidently feeling as he did. There was one man among the Conn troops that stepped back but he as soon stepped back in line, for he found himself alone. I know him in the days of my childhood, he was a verry overbearing man, a violent politician of the Jeffersonian School, his conversation and deportment was such in his intercourse with his fellow men, that he would be often reminded of his cowardice at Stoney Point. Gen Wayne was verry much pleased with the readiness they manifested to embark in this forlorn hope, their orders were to march in strict silence, and as rapid as possible. ;Mr.:Beach said the darkness could almost be felt, and their way was through brush over logs and fallen trees and up steep declivities almost perpendicular, until1 the gate of the fort on Stoney Point, revealed to the troops the object of this piece of millitary strategy. A verry bold laborious and hazardous attempt, but crowned with success. I think it was this strategem that gave him the name of Mad Anthony.

      Mr. Beach was at Yorktown, and in the [corp] which was under the command of Gen LaFayette. The old gentleman spoke of the seige and battle of Yorktown and the surrender of Lord Cornwallis as
      the last great act, and the final winding up of the grand millitary achievements of our great Revolutionary struggle.

      The fires of that patriotism which glowed in the breasts of our revolutionary sires, seemed to rekindle as he related to me the scenes of that eventful period. May we as a nation always hold in reverance the names of those patriotic men who fought for the great principles of civil and religious liberty, which was the means in the hands of an all wise providence in gaining our independence as a nation. Mr. Beach to murmer or complain because the government could not fulfill its promises to pay and when the first Act of the United States in Mr. Monroes administration in 1818, granting pensions to the indigent soldiers. There were some of the old soldiers who were not indigent but gave their property to their children in order to come under the act.

      This course Mr. Beach condemned without stint or measure. When the pension Act of 1830 was passed giving to all the old soldiers of the Revolution pensions; if I have been rightly informed, it was with much persuasion before Mr. Beach could be prevailed upon to m ake application, but finally he di, (sic) and received 96 dollars a year the remainder of his life. We find by the obituary, that he made a profession of religion in 1785. He and his wife united with the Cong. Church in Tallmadge May 19th, 1816, by letter with 15 others, all of which have gone to that bourne from whence no traveller returns, the last of this 15 was the Rev. Lorrin Andrews who died at Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Sept. 28th, 1868.

      Mr. Beach was identified with all things of a public nature, Mr. Beach was identified with all things of a public nature, the Academy School House, Meeting House, both Cong. and Methodist and always help to support the Gospel.

      Mrs. Beach was a woman of great endurance, great energy, industrious and verry frugal, and a most excellent housekeeper. And performed her part in obtaining the wealth which they possessed. Mrs. Beachs native place is unknown to the writer, but her fathers family were living on the Susquehanna at Wyoming in Pa, when the Indians and Tories performed that hellish deed of massacreing the defenseless citizens of that beautiful valley; her father fled from there with his family and after great hardships arrived in Connecticut. Mrs. Beach was born Aug. 25th, 1766, and was at the time of the invasion of the Valley of the Wyoming in July 1778, twelve years of age, but she retained through life a verry vivid recollection of the horrid scene of that eventful day. Her maiden name was Hannah Kimball, they were married Sept. 5th, 1784. Her death occurred March 9th, 1841, aged 74 years. Mr. Beach died July 4th, 1844, aged 87 years. Their children:

      1st - Daniel, born in Warren Ct., March 16th, 1785 - He married Lorinda, daughter of Salmon and Mercy (Curtiss) Sackett Jan. lst, 1810 and died in Ruggles, Ashland Co. 0. May 23rd, 1861 aged 76

      2nd - Charry born June 29th, 1786, married Ira Carter Jan. 30th, 1809, married 2nd, David Hine of Canfield, Mahoning Co 0 Dec. 13th, 1836, is now living at El Kader Iowa at an advanced age.

      3rd - Reuben Burton, born Aug. 26thf 1798, married Miss Phebe B daughter of Reuben and Hannah (Richardson) Upson April 18th, 1822. He died on the homestead Dec. 17th, 1865, aged 66 years. Mrs. Beach died Dec. 19th, 1867, aged 66 years.

      4th - Cynthia, born in Warren April 15th, 1805, married Harvey Fenn April 18th, 1822. Mrs. Fenn died in Sullivan, Ashland Co. 0. April loth, 1861 aged 57 years. By her own request she was buiried in Tallmadge.


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