Gaines, Richard Hollinger

Gaines, Richard Hollinger

Male 1777 - 1845  (67 years)

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  • Name Gaines, Richard Hollinger 
    Born 8 Nov 1777  Charlotte County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 Jan 1845  Sangamon County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Old Salem Cemetery, Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I21265  Sackett
    Last Modified 12 Oct 2017 

    Family Green, Amy Clay,   b. 3 Feb 1782, Charlotte County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Oct 1871, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Married 16 Oct 1802  Charlotte County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Gaines, Elizabeth,   b. 4 Dec 1811, Barren County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1900, Salisbury, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    +2. Gaines, Rev. Abram Clay,   b. 4 Jun 1814, Christian County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jul 1892  (Age 78 years)
    Last Modified 18 Jan 2009 
    Family ID F4553  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 8 Nov 1777 - Charlotte County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 Oct 1802 - Charlotte County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Gaines, Elizabeth - 4 Dec 1811 - Barren County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Gaines, Rev. Abram Clay - 4 Jun 1814 - Christian County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 7 Jan 1845 - Sangamon County, Illinois, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Old Salem Cemetery, Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Village/Neighborhood/Community Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Notes 
    • "Perhaps the first Methodist Church ever built in Christian County was the one built by the Hopkinsville "Society" on the lot recently owned by the late Ben. O. Welch, east of Railroad Street, between Market and Broad. We have no reocrd of the date when this society was organized, but the history of the church in Kentucky and Christian County makes it pretty sure that it was very early in the nineteenth century; for as early as 1809 Rev. Samuel H. Thompson had charge of the Christian Circuit, of which Hopkinsville was the principal preaching place, ("Methodism in Kentucky, page 291), although the circuit is not mentioned in the general minutes of the church until 1811. The names of most if not all the ministers who had served this church prior to 1811 have already been given in the general remarks on the church in the county. In addition to these may be named Benjamin Harrison, Ezekiel Harrison, Jr., John Burgess, Joseph Williams, Henry Allen, RICHARD GAINES, James Nichols, Jesse Harrison (and perhaps Reuben and Robert Harrison, both of whom were prominent Methodists), Thomas Kirkman, and John Graham, all of whom were then laymen in the church. But little is known of these men except that they were eminently pious and useful in their day. Their very names meant the Methodism of the times, and their lives were bright examples of goodness and holiness, which exerteed an influence for good in the community for many years after they had passed away. Rev. Kirkman was in the ministry for a good many years and died near Hopkinsville about forty years ago. He was not a man of great ability, but was so beloved that his name is still held in reverence by men who never saw him. If we are not mistaken, the Hopkinsville Church still preserves with care an old-fashioned, straight-back chair with his name on it, used by the good old man two generations ago. From the best information obtainable, we gather that the church here must have duly organized, as we have said, soon after the year 1800, though there had been Methodist preaching here some years before, as shown in another place. We are satisfied that the old "meeting house" was immediately erected, if, in fact, it was not already there. It was a dilapidated old establishment, and there are men now living in Hopkinsville (1884) who remember the benches without backs, and the "cracks in the floor so large that the chickens could be seen scratching underneath". It was of brick, and here the church grew and prospered. Dr. Redford thinks the church had no place of worship until 1820, and the court house was used for that purpose, That they had no church building prior to 1820 can be only true from a legal point of view; and, as a matter of fact, the church had no legal title to their place of worship until the 21st of October, 1822, when George Kirkman, of Todd County, for $170 cash, conveyed the lot before referred to to PETER CARTWRIGHT, Benjamin Harrison, Ezekiel Harrison, Jr., John Burgess, Joseph Williams, Henry Allen, RICHARD GAINES, James Nichols, and Jesse Harrison in trust for the Hopkinsville Methodist Church. It is probable that the court house was used at times, but the old house was there years before. It was in this old meeting-house that the Tennessee Conference met in 1820, and the deed from Kirkman to the church described the lot as "containing a Methodist meeting-house now erected". Some have thought this old church was new, perhaps incomplete at the time of the conference of 1820; but a reference to the aforsaid deed, executed in October, 1822, will show the following stipulation: " In trust, that they shall erect and build, or cause to be erected and built thereon, a house or place of worship for the use of the members", etc ., and it is within the memory of some yet living, that according to this trust the church did very soon afterward, perhaps in 1828, repair and add to the old structure so as to perfect the building which was used by the church until the year 1848 or 1849. We may add here that, though the subject of parsonages had been frequently discussed by the church since 1820 (as the records show), occasionally houses rented for that purpose, and in 1833 the purchase of a parsonage for the Presiding Elder was ordered, it was not until the year 1838 that the committee was directed "to inquire into the expediency of purchasing a parsonage", and not until 1846 that the Hopkinsville Church really bought one. This was on the same lot with the old church, and was also of brick. It was sold, however, in 1848.
      The following is a list of the preachers sent to the Christian Circuit (which included Hopkinsville) from 1810 to 1820, when Hopkinsville was cut o ff to itself and made a station: 1811, James Axley, Presiding Elder; PETER CARTWRIGHT, Circuit Preacher. The former of these was celebrated for his simplicity and meekness, the other for his great pugnacity. He was known and read of all men as the fighting preacher. Perhaps no man in the American pulpit since that day has been so noted for courage and audacity. His piety was not questioned, but his manner was extremely rude and sometimes unfortunate. Both were good preachers. From 1812 to 1816, PETER CARTWRI GHT, Presiding Elder; 1812, Jacob Turman, Circuit Preacher; 1814, John Johnson, Circuit Preacher. This last named gentleman enjoyed a great reputation as both a preacher and debater. It was in 1818 that the celebrated debates took place between him and Rev. Jeremiah Vardeman, a learned clergyman of the Baptist Church in Nashville and Hopkinsville. In these discussions, they both made fire and sparks fly until their reputations spread all over the country. In 1815, Claiborne Duval was the Preacher; 1816 to 1818, James Axley was again Presiding Elder; 1816 PETER CARTWRIGHT, Preache r; 1817, Benjamin Malone, Assistant, and John Devar, Circuit Preacher; 18 18 to 1821, Marcus Lindsey, Presiding Elder; 1818, John Cragg, Preacher; 1 819, PETER CARTWRIGHT, Assistant, and Martin Flint, Circuit Preacher.

      In 1820, the conference cut Hopkinsville off from the circuit, and it remained what is called in Methodist parlance "a station" (as contra-distinguished from a circuit) until 1837. The following is a list of preachers on station and circuit until then: The first preacher to the new station was Rev. Andrew Monroe in 1820. The circuit had PETER CARTWRIGHT and William W. McReynolds; 1821 to 1825, Charles Holiday, Presiding Elder; 1821, Hopkinsville, John Johnson; Christian Circuit, Thomas A. Morris and RICHARD GAINES, Preachers. It needs not to be mentioned to the Methodist readers of this history that this was the great and good Bishop Morris; . . ." from, "Methodist Church in Hoipkinsville", in "County of Christian, Kentucky: Historical and Biographical", edited by William Henry Perrin. Pages 220-222. Published by F.A. Battey Publishing Co., Chicago & Louisville, 1884. Reprinted by Heritage Books, Bowie MD, 1993 ISBN 1-55613-825- 3

      "The honor of having grown and shipped from the county (Christian) the first hogshead of tobacco is claimed for several persons. Some claim that William Fagin and Abraham Shelton shipped the first hogshead from Eddyville on the Cumberland River to New Orleans. It was rigged up like an exaggerated sod roller, and drawn by a pair of oxen or stout horses all the way to the river. Others claim the honor for RICHARD GAINES, a brother-in-law of the famous pioneer Methodist preacher, PETER CARTWRIGHT, and the tradition runs that the experiment cost him "more than it come to", or in other words that he lost money on it." same source as above, page 138

      "Since the days of Daniel Barry, whom Collins distinguishes as the "Irish Linguist", Hopkinsville has enjoyed the advantage of many noted and excellent educators. Barry taught here as early as 1812 . . . Here he had for pupils, among other, . . RICHARD GAINES, brother-in-law to Peter Cartwright". same source as above, page 243

      "Moved to Barren County, Kentucky in 1807, then to Christian County, Kentucky and on to Sangamon County, Illinois in 1824. The place where they settled in Sangamon County, Illinois is now Cartwright Township, about one mile north of where Pleasant Plains now stands. He was a local M.E. minister for about 30 years. After his death, Amy Clay Gaines lived with some family members, Abram Clay Gaines and Aunt Eliza Batterton" from, jhgaines@aol.com

      Children

      1. Robert Green GAINES b: 20 JUN 1801 in Charlotte Co., Virginia
      2. Mildred GAINES b: 4 OCT 1802 in Charlotte Co., Virginia
      3. Richard Frank GAINES b: 18 MAR 1806 in Charlotte Co., Virginia
      4. John GAINES b: 20 APR 1808 in Barren Co., Kentucky
      5. Coleman GAINES b: 28 DEC 1809 in Barren Co., Kentucky
      6. Eliza GAINES b: 4 DEC 1811 in Barren Co., Kentucky
      7. Abram Clay GAINES b: 4 JUN 1814 in Hopkinsville, Christian Co., Kentucky

  • Sources 
    1. [S543] Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com) (Reliability: 3), 12 Oct 2017.
      From Find A Grave Memorial# 178337622
      https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=178337622

      Richard Hollinger Gaines
      Birth: Nov., 1777
      Kentucky, USA
      Death: Jan. 7, 1845
      Illinois, USA

      Family links:
      Spouse:
      Amy Clay Green Gaines (1782 - 1871)*

      Children:
      Mildred Gaines Black (1802 - 1881)*
      Richard Francis Gaines (1806 - 1893)*
      John Gaines (1808 - 1898)*
      Coleman Gaines (1809 - 1900)*
      Elizabeth Gaines Batterton (1811 - 1900)*
      Abram Clay Gaines (1814 - 1892)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Burial:
      Old Salem Cemetery
      Springfield
      Sangamon County
      Illinois, USA

      Created by: Dixie P
      Record added: Apr 12, 2017
      Find A Grave Memorial# 178337622

      Researched by Ted Smith


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