Sackett,  John

Sackett, John

Male Abt 1623 - 1684  (~ 61 years)  

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  • Name Sackett, John  [1
    Born Abt 1623  Thanet, Kent, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died 3 Sep 1684  New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Person ID I7820  Sackett | Descendants of John Sackett the Colonist
    Last Modified 25 Aug 2015 

    Father Sackett, John,   b. Abt 1600, Bristol, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef Sep 1683, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years) 
    Mother ___, Miss,   d. Unknown 
    Children
    1. Sackett, John,   b. Abt 1623, Thanet, Kent, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Sep 1684, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    Family ID F2014  Group Sheet

    Family Tinkham, Agnes,   b. Abt 1630, Unknown Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1707, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years) 
    Married 20 May 1652  New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7
    Children 
     1. Sackett, Lt. John,   b. 30 Apr 1653, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Nov 1703, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
     2. Sackett, Jonathan,   b. 6 Jun 1655, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Feb 1727, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     3. Sackett, Mary,   b. 24 Sep 1657, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     4. Sackett, Lt. Joseph,   b. 3 Mar 1659, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1729, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     5. Sackett, Martha,   b. 19 Sep 1662, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1726, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
     6. Sackett, Sarah,   b. 26 Dec 1665, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
    Last Modified 11 Jan 2011 
    Family ID F3182  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1623 - Thanet, Kent, England, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 May 1652 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Lt. John - 30 Apr 1653 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Jonathan - 6 Jun 1655 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Mary - 24 Sep 1657 - New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Lt. Joseph - 3 Mar 1659 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Martha - 19 Sep 1662 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Sarah - 26 Dec 1665 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 3 Sep 1684 - New Haven County, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Town/Village/Neighborhood Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region/Continent/Ocean Not Set

  • Notes 
    • 5. John Sackett, Jr., 16__-1684, of New Haven, Conn., son of (2) John the colonist, was born in England and brought to New England by his father in 1631. He was at the time about three years of age. Very little is known of his boyhood days. In 1646 he was a member of the New Haven Train Band. The general court of that year first brought him to notice and gave him a place in the recorded history of Connecticut by fining him six cents "for wanting a rest at a training he attended." A rest was a stick crotched at one end which was used to steady the heavy musket then in use when taking aim.

      On May 20, 1652, he was married to Agnes Tinkham, who probably was a younger sister of the colonist Ephraim Tinkham, of Plymouth settlement. He remained a resident of New Haven until his death in 1684.

      The records there show that on October 6, 1684, "John Sackett" made and filed an inventory of the estate of "John Sackett, Junior." Agnes Tinkham Sackett died at New Haven in the early part of the year 1707. An inventory of her estate was filed on April 25th of that year by her grandson, Lieut. Joseph Sackett, who had previously been appointed administrator of her husband's estate. The records also show that on July 8, 1712, Lieut. Joseph Sackett made a final accounting of said estates and was discharged from his bonds. - Charles H. Weygant
      ==========================
      5. JOHN SACKETT was born c 1628 in England (Source: Weygant, Charles:
      Sacketts of America, p14.), and died 3 Sep 1684 in New Haven, CT (Source:
      New Haven Vital Records, p49, "John Sackett senior dyed 3 september
      1684."). He married AGNES TINKHAM 20 May 1652 in New Haven, Connecticut
      (Source: New Haven Vital Records, p3, "John Sacket and Agnes Tincome were
      married by the Governer the 20th of May 1652.".). She was born c 1630 in
      Plymouth, MA, and died 1707 in New Haven, Connecticut (Source: (1) Weygant,
      Charles: Sacketts of America, p19., (2) Savage, James: New England
      Dictionary.).

      Notes for JOHN SACKETT:
      [by Chris Sackett]

      John Sackett's origins

      Despite extensive research, it has not yet proved possible to establish the
      origins of John Sackett of New Haven. Weygant's conclusion that this John
      was the son of another John, who would have been a brother of Simon the
      colonist, has since been disproved. At least, Weygant's main evidence for
      the existence of a senior John [that he survived John of New Haven who died
      in 1684] has been disproved. The parentage of John of New Haven remains
      unknown and, of course, his father may have been named John. Again, while
      it is difficult to prove a negative, there is no evidence of a John Sackett
      having accompanied Simon on his migration to the New World.

      Weygant's evidence

      Weygant's main evidence was a 1684 inventory of the estate of John Sackett.
      It would seem that Weygant did not, himself, have sight of this document
      but, relying upon a report of it from the Hon. L B Sackett [# 4361], he
      stated in The Family Record, 1897 [p50], "That he [the alleged elder John]
      outlived his son John, Jr. is made apparent by following extract from a
      search of Probate office of New Haven, . . . . viz:"

      "John Sackett, inventory of the estate of John Sackett, Junior, late of New
      Haven, deceased, taken this 6th day of Oct. 1684."

      Weygant took the first mentioned "John Sackett" in the above heading of the
      inventory to refer to John Sackett Sr. as he states in his 1907 book [p14],
      "On October 6 [1684], he [the alleged elder John] filed an inventory of the
      estate of "John Sackett, Jr.""

      Further study of the inventory reveals that the first mentioned "John
      Sackett" was indeed John Sackett, Sr. but that the second mentioned "John
      Sackett" was also John Sackett, Sr. Thus, the two mentions are of the same
      man, the first being merely an index entry, rather than an indication of
      who filed the inventory. Our 'translation' of the text of the heading is:

      "Jno Sackett Snr/ An inventory of the estate of Jno Sackett Senior late of
      N=Haven deceased taken this Octobr 6th 1684."

      Confirmatory evidence that the word in the inventory is Senior and not
      Junior is obtained from the New Haven Vital Records 1649-1850 [p49]: "John
      Sackett senior dyed 3 september 1684."

      For some time prior to 1684 John Sackett of New Haven would have been
      referred to as John Sackett Sr, his own son John, born 1653, being referred
      to as John Sackett Jr. Indeed, in the records of town meetings held in
      November and December 1682, there is reference to John Sackett Jr. There
      can, thus, be no doubt that the John Sackett who died in 1684 was John
      Sackett Sr., i.e. John Sackett of New Haven who married Agnes Tinkham.

      Anderson (see Appendix) refers to Weygant's proposed existence of an elder
      John Sackett who would be a brother of Simon, but dismisses this with, "The
      proposed elder John seems to be an imaginary construct, and there is no
      evidence of any relationship between the immigrant Simon and John of New
      Haven."

      Weygant relied, too, on the "family tradition" as told to him by his
      father-in-law, that Simon with his brother, John, travelled on the Lyon in
      company with Roger Williams. Whilst the further research described above
      disagrees with Weygant's proposal for an elder John, it still leaves the
      question of John's parentage unknown. His migration also remains unsolved.
      Was he taken to New England as a boy by his parents, or by Simon? Or did he
      go in the service of a Mrs Stolyon with whom he was involved in a court
      action? Research continues to try to resolve this tantalising mystery.

      New Haven

      John Sackett arrived in New Haven at a very early stage of its settlement,
      the first mention of him in the records being within three years of its
      foundation. The colony was established in the spring of 1638 when the
      companies of Davenport and Prudden sailed from Boston to Quillipiac, where
      they began the settlement that would become New Haven. The New Haven church
      was established, with seven founding members, Davenport included, on 21 or
      22 April 1639, and on the latter day Peter Prudden and his following
      organized the Milford church. [Anderson: Great Migration Newsletter].

      A list of planters and their estates was drawn up in October/November 1640,
      although it was not written into the records until 1643. [Lambert,
      Jacobus]. John Sackett's name does not appear in this list [nor does that
      of Mrs Stolyon]. If he were at New Haven by this date, he would not have
      qualified for inclusion in the list being a youth of 12 years of age.

      The Stolyon case

      The first mention of John Sackett found in the New Haven records concerns a
      court action brought against him by Mrs Stolyon:

      "Att a Court held att Newhaven the 4th of the 6t M: 1641
      John Seckett servant to Mrs. Stolyon for goeing about to slaunder and
      reproach his said Mrs, was admonished to tender to his Mrs such
      satisfaction as she might accept, wch was referred to Mr. Goodyeare to
      determine."
      [Hoadly, p56]

      This John "Seckett" is now taken to be John Sackett of New Haven [at the
      time of the court action he would have been aged about 13, assuming his
      birth in c 1628], although Weygant concluded that it referred to the
      proposed elder John. He gave this account of the case in his 1897 The
      Family Record:

      "His [the proposed elder John's] name is first mentioned in New Haven
      records under date of 1640, at which time he was in the employ and would
      seem to have been superintending the estate of a widow named Stolya.
      According to a tradition which is in the main verified by official records,
      he was a man of pleasing address, and the widow Stolya from playing mother
      to the son fell desperately in love with the father, who does not appear to
      have reciprocated her affection and spoke slightingly of her love making.
      Whereupon she made complaint to the General Court that he had slandered
      her. When the case was heard the finding of that August body, "then the
      supreme power in the province," was that "John Seckett (Sackett) be
      admonished to tender to the widow Stolya such satisfaction as she might
      accept."

      Although there is a discrepancy in the dates given for the court hearing
      [Hoadly 1641, Weygant 1640], there can be no doubt that Weygant refers to
      the same case. His rather colourful description presumably owed more to the
      "tradition" to which he refers than to the court record itself. Research of
      the New Haven records has failed to find any reference to John Sackett in
      1640. [The dates discrepancy would seem not to be the result of the often
      confusing Julian calendar then in use, as the "6t M" would mean September,
      a month not subject to double-dating]. [see Appendix Dates].

      Histories of New Haven

      Atwater, in his History of the Colony of New Haven (publ. 1902), gives
      lists of the seating plans in the meeting house of New Haven for March
      1646, February 1655/56, and February 1661/62. Dexter, New Haven Ancient
      Town Records, 1917, also gives the 1655/56 and 1661/62 lists. John
      Sackett's name appears in the 1655/56 and 1661/62 lists but not in the
      first (1646) list. His omission from the first list is consistent with his
      being underage at that date (he was then about 17 assuming a birth in
      c1628). Had there been an elder John Sackett, then he would surely have
      appeared in this 1646 list. Similarly, had there been two John Sacketts,
      father and son, they would both have appeared in the two later lists.

      John Sackett swears oath; is fined; sues for a debt

      On 1 July 1644, aged about 16, John swore the oath of fidelity at a General
      Court of New Haven. [Hoadly, pp136-139]. The court record of 6 October 1646
      when John Sackett was fined 6 pence for attending a training without a rest
      for his musket is reported by Hoadly at pp270-271. John appeared in court
      again later that year on 2 March 1646 [1647 new style] when he "demanded a
      debt dew from Stephen Medcalfe of 18s." At a further court hearing two
      months later, on 4 May 1647, two townsmen who had been appointed to assess
      work carried out by John on Medcalfe's house confirmed that John had
      erected fencing, and John "gave in a noate to the court" showing that he
      had spent 17s 8d on materials. [Hoadly, pp300 & 307].

      John Sackett's occupation

      Atwater does not report this case but records John Sackett's occupation as
      "carpenter". [p703]. He may have deduced this from the above court action.
      It could equally be concluded from the report of a later case [John Sackett
      v. Samuel Andrews, 1665/66] that John was also a "horse doctor"! The truth
      is likely to be that John, along with most of his compatriots, was both a
      farmer and, by necessity, a "jack of all trades." Atwater also gives 1641
      as the date of the first mention of John in the New Haven Colony records
      and records his death date as 1684.

      John Sackett's bull

      John Sackett appeared in court again in May 1656 when he, with three
      others, "were complained of because their cattell trouble the cowheards."
      They were advised "to take care that it be no more so." In particular, John
      was "warned of a bull which is wont to runn at some people." He was
      instructed to ensure that the bull was properly secured "that hurt may not
      come thereby, for if it doe, after this warning, the blame will lye wholy
      upon him."

      John Sackett's wolf

      It would appear that townsmen were rewarded with a bounty of 1 per head
      for the capture of wolves. At the same court, John appealed against a
      decision of the town treasurer who had refused to pay him for the capture
      of a wolf at the last harvest. John explained to the court that the wolf
      was "catched in a pitt" but was so "devoured by flyes" that "the head was
      not fitt to bring to the Treasurer, and he refuseth to pay." The Town
      agreed that if he could provide sufficient proof "he shall be alowed halfe,
      which is ten shillings." [Dexter, vol 1 p278].

      John Sackett's brook

      Mention is made in a general court hearing at New Haven on 28 February 1658
      [old style] of John Sackett's brook. To provide an adequate water supply
      for the town, the court decided "to make a dam over ye creeke, . . . &
      there to sett up a brest mill, which with the help of the brooke at John
      Sackett's . . . would be sufficient to serve ye towne." [Dexter, vol 1 pp
      390-391].

      John Sackett, horse doctor

      In a court hearing on 5 March 1665/66, John actioned Samuel Andrews for the
      cost of treating a sick horse. Andrews "denied that [John] had cured ye
      horse" but the court found in John's favour and awarded him five shillings
      and court costs. [Dexter, vol 2 p173].

      A highway through John Sackett's land, & the burning of woods

      On 12 February 1671/72, it was reported at a town meeting that agreement
      had been reached for the construction of a "hie way through the playne
      field" belonging to John Sackett and, in consideration, John was given
      about three acres of swampy land. [Dexter, vol 2 p302]. At a town meeting
      on 11 March 1673/74 it was decided that areas of woodland were to be burnt.
      The sections of the woods to be burnt were allocated to various townsmen
      and John Sackett and Edmund Dorman were to burn the area from "ye west
      rockes to ye Mill river." [Dexter, vol 2 p316].

      John Sackett's division of land

      A town meeting of 20 December 1680 determined the division of land on the
      western side, John Sackett being allocated an area of 48 acres. [Dexter,
      vol 2, p408]. The next entries in the records of town meetings refer to
      John Sackett, Jr. who, in November and December 1682, was granted land to
      set up a business as a glazier.

      Proprietors in 1685

      The last mention of John Sackett Sr. in the New Haven records appears in a
      report given to a town meeting on 22 December 1712 when a list was
      submitted of proprietors of the town in the year 1685. The list included:
      "John Sackets heirs" [i.e. the heirs of John Sackett, Sr.] and "John
      Sacket, Junior."

      Weygant's 1907 account

      It is interesting (and surprising in light of how little other information
      he had available to him) that Weygant did not repeat the Stolya story in
      his 1907 Sacketts of America book. It may be conjectured that he had, by
      then, had second thoughts about his interpretation of the case.

      Weygant's account of the proposed elder John is given at p14 of The
      Sacketts of America:

      "(2) JOHN SACKETT, colonist, and founder of the New Haven branch of the
      Sackett family, came to New England, from Bristol, England, with his
      brother Simon, on the ship Lyon, in the winter of 1630-31. He brought with
      him his son, John Sackett, Jr., who at the time was about three years of
      age. No record of any other member of his immediate family has been found.
      Either before leaving England, or during his tedious mid-winter voyage
      hither, he became strongly attached to the brilliant and popular
      non-conformist minister, Roger Williams, whom he followed first to Plymouth
      settlement and afterwards to Rhode Island. Tiring of life in the wilderness
      he made his way to New Haven settlement, in the records of which he is
      mentioned as early as 1640 and as late as 1684. On October 6, of the year
      last mentioned, he filed an inventory of the estate of "John Sackett, Jr."
      "

      At p19, he gives the following account of John Sackett Jr. (John of New
      Haven):

      "(5) JOHN SACKETT, JR., 16??-1684, of New Haven, Conn., son of (2) John the
      colonist, was born in England and brought to New England by his father in
      1631. He was at the time about three years of age. Very little is known of
      his boyhood days. In 1646 he was a member of the New Haven Train Band. The
      general court of that year first brought him to notice and gave him a place
      in the recorded history of Connecticut by fining him six cents "for wanting
      a rest at a training he attended." A rest was a stick crotched at one end
      which was used to steady the heavy musket then in use when taking aim.
      On May 20, 1652, he was married to Agnes Tinkham, who probably was a
      younger sister of the colonist Ephraim Tinkham, of Plymouth settlement. He
      remained a resident of New Haven until his death in 1684.
      The records there show that on October 6, 1684, "John Sackett" made and
      filed an inventory of the estate of "John Sackett, Junior." Agnes Tinkham
      Sackett died at New Haven in the early part of the year 1707. An inventory
      of her estate was filed on April 25th of that year by her grandson, Lieut.
      Joseph Sackett, who had previously been appointed administrator of her
      husband's estate. The records show that on July 8, 1712, Lieut. Joseph
      Sackett made a final accounting of said estates and was discharged from his
      bonds."

      Weygant's 1897 account

      As well as the omission in his 1907 work of mention of the Stolion case,
      there are other significant differences between the 1897 Family Record and
      the 1907 Sacketts of America. These differences would seem to point to
      Weygant having had doubts or second thoughts by the time he came to compile
      his magnum opus. It does seem strange that, given the scant data which he
      has available in 1907 on both the alleged elder John and on John of New
      Haven, he should choose to omit information which he had previously
      reported in 1897.

      In the Family Record, he reports that [the alleged elder] John Sackett
      signed the oath of fidelity and continues, "and in 1646 was made the
      custodian of the Public Building in which the General Court was held",
      quoting the 1647 court record of the action by John Sackett [of New Haven]
      against Stephen Medcalfe. Weygant's quote from the court records does not
      mention Medcalfe, and says, "John Sackett presented to court bill for
      putting up some poles and spending some nayles; the said John gave in a
      note to the court, of charges which had been spent about the house, to the
      value of about 17s 8d." It would seem that Weygant took the reference to
      "the house" to mean the Court House and concluded that John had been made
      the custodian of the building. It is not known whether Weygant had access
      to Hoadly's work, which had been published in 1857. Hoadly's account makes
      it clear that the work carried out was to Medcalfe's house, not to the
      court house. Weygant did not include reference to this court action in his
      1907 book.
      ________________
      References:
      *Atwater, History of the Colony of New Haven, 1902
      *Cutter, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut, 1911
      *Dexter, New Haven Ancient Town Records, 1917
      *Hoadly, Records of the Colony and Plantation of New Haven, 1857
      *Jacobus, Families of Ancient New Haven, 1981
      *Lambert, History of the Colony of New Haven, 1838
      *New Haven Probate Records
      *New Haven Vital Records
      *Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 1860-62
      *Smith, Families of Ancient New Haven, 1923-1931
      *Torrey, New England Marriages prior to 1700, printed 1997
      *Weygant,The Family Record, 1897
      Also listed in this database as #7820
      Weygant, pg19; # 5

  • Sources 
    1. [S611] Jacobus, Jacobus, Donald Lines, (1923-1932), p1583; Fam. 1. (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S713] Chris Sackett, http://sackettfamily.info/g2/p2501.htm, 25 Aug 2015.
      John Sackett, colonist and founder of the New Haven, Connecticut, branch of the Sackett family, was born, almost certainly in the Isle of Thanet, Kent, in say 1623.1 His parents have not yet been positively identified. He died in New Haven on 3 September 1684. He married in New Haven on 20 May 1652, Agnes Tinkham1, who died there in 1707.

      It has not yet proved possible to establish with any confidence the origins of John Sackett of New Haven, although a number of possibilities may be considered.

      Weygant, in The Sacketts of America, records that he was the son of another John who would have been a brother of Simon Sackett the colonist, and that he was born in England in 1628 and brought to New England by his father in 1631.

    3. [S241] NHV, Jacobus, Donald Lnnes.

    4. [S8] Weygant, Weygant, Charles H., (Newburgh, N. Y., 1907), p19, #5 (Reliability: 3).

    5. [S241] NHV, Jacobus, Donald Lnnes, cited by Jacobus (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S611] Jacobus, Jacobus, Donald Lines, (1923-1932), p1583; cites NHV (Reliability: 3).

    7. [S8] Weygant, Weygant, Charles H., (Newburgh, N. Y., 1907), p19 (Reliability: 3).


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