Sackett,  Alexander Thomas

Sackett, Alexander Thomas

Male 1820 - 1865  (45 years)  

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  • Name Sackett, Alexander Thomas 
    Born 1820  Wayne County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 31 Mar 1865  At Sea, off Cape Hattaras, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Columbia Cemetery, Columbia Twp., Wapello, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I3936  Sackett | Simon Sackett the Colonist, Descendants of Thomas Sacket the Elder
    Last Modified 4 Sep 2013 

    Father Sackett, Dr. David Filer,   b. 18 Jan 1780, Kent (Town of), Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1864, Irvington, Marion County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Milliken, Martha,   b. Jan 1787, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Apr 1874, Irvington, Marion County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 87 years) 
    Married 1807  Greensburg, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 12 children 
    Family ID F1627  Group Sheet

    Family Gilbert, Cornelia Clark,   b. 6 Jul 1824, Whitehall, Washington, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1908, Dudley, Wapello, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 20 Feb 1845  Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Place and date of marriage from Cornelia (Gilbert) Sackett's Widow's Pension File #108,200, Declaration for Minor Children for Pension, 20 Feb 1870.
    Children 
     1. Sackett, Mary Ellen,   b. 30 Nov 1845,   d. 22 Dec 1926  (Age 81 years)
     2. Sackett, Thomas Leroy,   b. 1 Nov 1847, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jul 1929  (Age 81 years)
     3. Sackett, Emma Elizabeth,   b. 15 Apr 1849, Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1933, Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     4. Sackett, Daniel Milliken,   b. 31 Aug 1851, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1919  (Age 67 years)
     5. Sackett, Jennie Cecilia,   b. 28 Oct 1853, Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Feb 1915, Eddyville, Wapello, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     6. Sackett, Charles Jefferson,   b. 18 Oct 1855, Wapello County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1923, Chillicothe, Wapello, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     7. Sackett, James Alonzo "Lonnie",   b. 20 May 1857, Wapello County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1935  (Age 77 years)
     8. Sackett, Clara Almira,   b. 10 Apr 1859, Monroe County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1945  (Age 86 years)
     9. Sackett, William T.,   b. 7 Dec 1862, Wapello County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jul 1865, Davis County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2009 
    Family ID F1656  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1820 - Wayne County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Feb 1845 - Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Thomas Leroy - 1 Nov 1847 - Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Emma Elizabeth - 15 Apr 1849 - Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Daniel Milliken - 31 Aug 1851 - Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Jennie Cecilia - 28 Oct 1853 - Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Charles Jefferson - 18 Oct 1855 - Wapello County, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, James Alonzo "Lonnie" - 20 May 1857 - Wapello County, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, Clara Almira - 10 Apr 1859 - Monroe County, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sackett, William T. - 7 Dec 1862 - Wapello County, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 31 Mar 1865 - At Sea, off Cape Hattaras, North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Columbia Cemetery, Columbia Twp., Wapello, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Town/Village/Neighborhood Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region/Continent/Ocean Not Set

  • Histories
    2 Sons of Dr. David Sackett on Rival Sides in Civil War
    2 Sons of Dr. David Sackett on Rival Sides in Civil War
    Edited OCR:
    The story of Dr. David L. Sackett, pioneer Wayne county physician, dealt with in a previous article, told an interesting tale of early life in the settlement which grew into Richmond.
    No less colorful are the histories of his descendants. Two of his sons served in the Union army and one with the Confederate forces.
    Alexander…

  • Notes 
    • Alexander T. Sackett, son of Dr. David Filer Sackett and Martha Milliken, was born 1820 in Wayne Co., IN. He was married 20 Feb 1845 in Muncie, IN. to Cornelia Clark Gilbert. Unfortunately, we know more about his service in the Civil War and his death than we do about the rest of his life.
      ---------
      Charles Weygant; "The Sacketts of America", Pages 358-359
      "3962. Alexander Sackett, 1820-1864, son of (1535) Dr., David F. and Martha Milliken Sackett, was married Feb. 20, 1845, to Cornelia Clark Gilbert, daughter of William Gilbert and his wife Anna Delamater. Mr. Sackett was a Union veteran of the Cival War. He enlisted in 8th Iowa Cavalry, which was attached to the 15th Army Corps. After participating with credit in several engagements he was captured by the Confederates in McCook's raid at Newman, Georgia and suffered confinement in several prisons. At length, in 1864, he was exchanged, and broken in health started north on the steamer General Lyon, which was lost with all on board between Fortress Monroe and Wilmington. In 1869 his widow married Hampton Olney, who died in 1883. In 1905 she was residing with her son, James A. Sackett, on a farm they own jointly near Dudley, Ill."
      [Descendants of Alexander state that Dudley is in Wapello Co., IA and not in IL.]
      ---------
      Year: 1860; State: IA; County: Wapello County; Township: Columbia Township
      Page: 662
      509/516
      Sackett, Alexander 40 m farmer IN W #3962
      [Sackett], Cornelia C. 32 f NY
      Sackett, Mary E. 19 f IN W #6890
      Sackett, Thomas 12 m IN W #6891
      Sackett, Emma 11 f IN W #6892
      Sackett, Miligan 8 m IN W #6893
      Sackett, Jane 6 f IN W #6894
      Sackett, Charles J. 4 m IA W #6895
      Sackett, Alonzo 3 m IA W #6896
      Sackett, Clara 1 f IA W #6897
      ---------
      Accounts of the movements of the 8th Iowa Cavalry and the 4th Kentucky Infantry leading up to the raid at Newman, GA., and the capture of a large number of men, can be found at:

      http://www.ukans.edu/carrie/kancoll/andreas_ne/military/military-p7.html

      http://www.rootsweb.com/~seky/folfoot/017.html
      THE 4TH KENTUCKY INFANTRY:
      "After being furloughed at Louisville, the unit rendezvoused at Camp Nelson in early
      March of 1864, reorganizing as a mounted regiment, returning to the war via
      Nashville, Tn. and on to Snake Creek Gap, Ga., skirmishing at Lafayette on June 24.

      In July, the unit left Snake Creek Gap and joined McCook's Cavalry Division at the
      Chattahoochie River. It engaged in battle at Mason's Church, Lovejoy's, Shakerag
      and at Newman, Ga., where a large portion of regiment was captured. The
      remainder of the regiment returned to Nashville to refit ..."
      http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/5420/civil2.htm
      "They remained in Camp about Two Weeks - on the North Bank of the Chattahoui River
      in Front of the Rebel Lines and in Sight of Atlanta, When some Time towards the
      last of July - then our Regt with 3 others under Genl Ed McCook were Sent on an
      Expidition South in the Rear of the Rebel Lines to Cut thier Communications with
      ther Source of Supplies and Reinforcements ..."
      "... if Now they had turned back all would have been well - the had
      done all and more they had set out to do and the Line of Retreat was Yet Open -
      but No - Fate had Orderd it to otherwise, they Kept on one more day - and then it
      was to Late. A Large Rebbel Force was after Them - they now tried another Rout
      to try and cut thier way out But on the 30th of July were brought to Bay and Stop
      and Fight. This took place at Newman Ga. 4 Miles South of it and about 60 Miles
      South of Atlanta on the Plantation of an Old Retired Presbetarian Minister by Name
      of Cook. ..."
      "... The Unhorsed Boys took to the Brush and tried to Escape that Way -
      but only a very few reached Camp - the Rest were Captured and for Months after
      Sufferd All the Maryterdome of that Hell on Earth, Andersonville and quite a
      Number Died ..." We do not have records of the prisons in which Alexander T. Sackett was imprisoned. There is no known record of him having been in Andersonville. However there are several thousands of prisoners who were in Andersonville for whom there are no records.

      The accounts of the loss of the Steamer General Lyon would suggest that Alexander T. Sackett had been in Florence Stockade or Salaisbury Prison prior to his parole;
      "Passenger List of the Steamer General Lyon when the ship burned to the waterline off Cape Hatteras, NC on or about 31 March 1865. (not to be mistaken as the U.S.S. General Lyon)

      Her passengers consisted of discharged soldiers, paroled prisoners of war (most of whom were from the Florence Stockade, SC & Salisbury Prison, NC) and refugees; including about thirty women and twenty-five small children. ..."
      Documents in Alexander's military file :
      1) A document from The Adjutant General's Office, dated 23 April 1867 states that he was "reported a paroled prisioner of war lost on board Steamer General Lyon March 31st 1865".
      2) In Cornelia Sackett's petition for a pension dated 12 Aug 1865, she states; "That she is the widow of Alexander Sackett who was "on board the Steamer "Gen. Lyon" when said Steamer was lost at sea."
      3) In the document titled; Declaration of Minor Children for Pensions, dated 21 Jan 1870, it is stated that "Alexander Sackett died by being lost on the US Steamer Gen'l Lyon on the 1st day of April in the year 1865 being lost as above stated in the line of his duty as a soldier near Cape Hatteras, N.C."


      Accounts of the loss of the Steamer General Lyon can be found at
      http://home.att.net/~florencestockade/genlyon.htm [Sources]:
      Transcribed by Bernard Yeatts
      The New York Times - Monday, April 3, 1865; Vol. XIV No. 4220 Page 5

      DREADFUL FIRE AT SEA.
      FIVE HUNDRED LIVES LOST

      The U. S. Transport Steamer General Lyon Burned Off Cape Hatteras.
      Invalid Troops, Refugees, and Women and Children on Board.

      The steamer Gen. Sedgwick, which arrived at this port at noon yesterday,
      brought as passengers twenty-nine persons saved from the wreck of the
      transport steamer Gen. Lyon, which took fire off Cape Hatteras on the
      morning of Friday last, and was totally destroyed. The Gen. Lyon had on
      board from five hundred and fifty to six hundred souls. The twenty-nine
      who arrived here yesterday are believed to be all that was saved.

      It appears from the statements of these men that the Gen. Lyon, a screw
      steamer which had formerly been used as a blockade-runner, sailed from
      Wilmington for Fortress Monroe, on the morning of Wednesday last, with
      nearly six hundred persons on board, including the crew.

      Her passengers consisted of discharged and paroled soldiers, escaped
      prisoners and refugees, among whom were about thirty women and
      twenty-five small children. Two negroes were also among the refugees. The
      weather was fair on leaving Wilmington, but the steamer put into the port
      of Smithfield for the night and resumed her voyage on the following
      morning. Soon after leaving Smithfield the wind, which was blowing from
      the southwest, increased in violence, and the vessel, which was a very
      slow one, made but little progress. At ten o'clock on Friday morning she
      was off Cape Hatteras, the wind having increased to a hurricane and the
      sea running very high. It is believed that the vessel was about sixty
      miles from land when an alarm of fire was given, and in a few minutes
      afterward the flames broke out at the rear of the pilot-house and nearly
      in the centre of the vessel. Several of the crew were in the rigging, and
      there were very few persons on deck at the time, many of the passengers
      being confined to their berths by sickness. The first mate, James Gibbs,
      and the other officers of the vessel immediately got the fire pumps to
      work with which, and the requisite quantity of hose, the vessel was well
      provided. But the flames steadily gained headway, and although the pumps
      were worked with unflinching perseverance, the fire soon spread over the
      centre portion of the deck, driving the crew and those who were assisting
      them to the stern and bow of the vessel. The hatches had been closed in
      consequence of the decks being so constantly under water, but those
      below, alarmed by the smoke which was spreading through he cabins, rushed
      on deck only to be driven back by the flames. The frightful shrieks of
      the women and children, and their piteous supplications for help were
      drowned by the roaring of the storm. Several of the paroled soldiers were
      sick and confined to their berths. Some of them managed to crawl on deck,
      and clung there until washed overboard by the waves. In about half an
      hour after the fire broke out, the engines partially stopped, and the
      vessel immediately swung round with her broadside to the wind, and the
      flames then spreading across the deck.

      It had now became quite evident that the ship could not be saved. The
      first officer acted with great courage, and only abandoned the vessel
      when all hopes of saving her were gone. The fire-pumps wee still kept at
      work, and the flames were fought back with great determination. Many of
      those below were doubtless already suffocated. The shrieks and moans of
      the dying came up to those on deck, but they could do nothing to help
      them. Just at this time a steamer, which proved to be the United States
      transport Gen. Sedgwick, Capt. Starkey, and a small schooner, hove in
      sight. But neither of them could render any assistance, owing to the
      violence of the storm and the fact that the burning steamer had drifted
      in toward the breakers. The flames were now spreading with fearful
      rapidity. The boats were launched, although there appeared to be little
      hope of their living in such a sea. Into the first boat ten men lowered
      themselves, including the Captain of the General Lyon. It is affirmed by
      several of those who escaped that the Captain had lost all control of
      himself, and was evidently crazed with fear. Hardly had this boat been
      loosed from the vessel's side than she drifted under her stern, was
      struck by the screw, and almost instantly went down. Irah Lewis, a
      private in the Eighty-ninth New-York Regiment, who was in the boat at the
      time, states that he saw the Captain sink. Lewis and two others alone
      escaped. A second boat was launched, and in this twenty-seven persons,
      including the First Mate, John Haydon, lowered themselves and succeeded
      in reaching the General Sedgwick, which was about a mile and a half
      distant. As the boat touched the steamer's side a wave dashed her
      violently against it, and she filled and went down. Of the twenty-seven
      persons in the boat, seven only were saved. Among these were the Mate,
      James Gibbs, Barney Losey, of the Fifth Virginia Regiment, and John
      Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-sixth Illinois. In the meantime a number of the
      men had thrown themselves overboard, trusting to a spar for support. One
      man, Isaiah C. Colby, of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry, after working at the
      fire pumps until he was almost exhausted, seized one of the doors of the
      galley and sprang overboard. He was in the water three hours before he
      was picked up. Others were also in the water for several hours, and many,
      doubtless, sank before assistance could be rendered. It is supposed that
      the schooner did not succeed in rescuing any of them. So far as known,
      the following are the only persons saved out of a total of from 550 to
      600: ...
      ---------------------------
      Extract from the Passenger List of the Steamer General Lyon:
      [I've extracted just those from Iowa. - T. King]
      IOWA

      ARNOLD, James - Private, Co. F, 15th IA Infantry - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 3, 5, 7
      BELKNAP, Fernando - Private, Co. D, 17th IA Infantry - Paroled Prisoner - Mustered out 25 July 1865 at Louisville, KY - 1, 3, 5, 7
      CAVOY or CALVORY, J. - 3rd IA Cavalry - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 3, 5
      DAVIS, A. - IA - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 5 - May be same as Davis, R.
      DAVIS, R. - 11th IA - Paroled Prisoner - 3 - May be same as Davis, A.
      DOWNING, J. C. - 24th IA - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 3, 5
      McDOWELL, C. - 8th IA Cavalry - Paroled Prisoner - 3 - Possibly John C. McDole.
      MORRIS, Calvin P. - Sergeant, Co. D, 17th IA Infantry - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 3, 5, 7
      MURRAY, Perry G. - Sergeant, Co. I, 39th IA Infantry - Paroled Prisoner - Perished approx. 28 March 1865 - 1, 3 as B. Gunway, 5, 7
      RHODES, Joseph - Private, Co. C, 3d IA Cavalry - Paroled Prisoner - 3, 5, 7
      SACKETT, Alexander T. - Private, Co. B, 8th IA Cavalry - Paroled Prisoner - 1, 3, 5, [6*], 7
      *Pension file for his minor children

      Sources
      1.National Archives
      2.New York Times, April 3d, 1865 & Military Disasters
      3.New York Times, April 14th, 1865
      4.Times of London, April 27th, 1865
      5.New York Times, January 19th, 1866
      6.Pension File / National Archives
      7.Regimental Information
      The numbers that follow the names represent the above sources where their name was found.
      ----------------
      From WPA records - Columbia Cemetery, Columbia Township, IA.: Sackett, Alexander T. born 1819, died April 1, 1865; Co. B 8th Iowa Cavalry.
      There is a grave site in Columbia Cemetery, ColumbiaTownship, IA. However, this would be a memorial marker. Memorial headstones were often erected for those who died in the Civil War and the soldier's body was never recovered. In this instance, it appears that Alexander's name was added to the headstone of his wife, Cornelia, and his young son, William, who died shortly after his father's death.
      ----------
      Died At Sea, off Cape Hattaras, NC

  • Sources 
    1. [S158] Pension File N. 108,200.

    2. [S30] Headstone, Memorial Headstone (Reliability: 3).


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