Noble,  Thomas

Noble, Thomas

Male Abt 1632 - 1704  (~ 72 years)  

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  • Name Noble, Thomas 
    Born Abt 1632  England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 20 Jan 1704  Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I22  Sackett
    Last Modified 30 Mar 2017 

    Family Warriner, Hannah,   b. 17 Aug 1643, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 12 May 1721  (Age 77 years) 
    Married 1 Nov 1660  Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Noble, John,   b. 6 Mar 1662, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 1714, New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
    +2. Noble, Thomas,   b. 14 Jan 1666, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jul 1750, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +3. Noble, Mark,   b. Aug 1670, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1741, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 70 years)
    +4. Noble, Sgt. Luke,   b. 15 Jul 1675, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Mar 1744, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
    Last Modified 13 Mar 2018 
    Family ID F18  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1632 - England, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1 Nov 1660 - Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Noble, John - 6 Mar 1662 - Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Noble, Thomas - 14 Jan 1666 - Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Noble, Mark - Aug 1670 - Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Noble, Sgt. Luke - 15 Jul 1675 - Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 20 Jan 1704 - Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Cemetery Street/Feature Town/Village/Neighborhood Township/Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region/Continent/Ocean Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S80] Boltwood, Boltwood, Lucius Manlius, (Hartford, Conn; Case,Lockwood & Brainard Co.,; 1878) (Reliability: 2), 30 Mar 2017.

    2. [S80] Boltwood, Boltwood, Lucius Manlius, (Hartford, Conn; Case,Lockwood & Brainard Co.,; 1878) (Reliability: 2), 30 Mar 2017.
      From https://archive.org/stream/historyandgenea00boltgoog/historyandgenea00boltgoog_djvu.txt

      Lightly edited by Ted Smith

      Digitized by

      Google

      THOMAS NOBLE

      AND HIS DESCENDANTS.


      FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN.

      1.

      THOMAS NOBLE was the emigrant ancestor of the largest famify in the United States bearing the name of Noble. He was born as early as 1632, probably in some part of England, and died in
      Westfield, Mass., Jan. 20, 1704, m. at least 72 yrs. His exact origin and early history axe involved in obscurity, {he place of his birth, the
      names of his parents, and the year in which he came to this country, being alike unknown. He was, without doubt, here in 1653, and was
      the man mentioned by Drake, (History of Boston, p. 331,) as admitted, on the 6th of January of that year, an inhabitant of Boston.
      The same year, he removed to Springfield, Mass., and opened an acooont at the store of John Pynchon. Though not one of the founders, he may he considered as one of the early settlers of that
      ancient town, the first settlement having been made in 1636, only seventeen years before. A few years after removing to Springfield, he visited England, as appears from an account-book of Mr.
      Pynchon. On the 1st of September, 1657, he was indebted to Pynchon to the amountof £32 3«. 6 << To what I pd.for your passage to and fro. Eng^d., and for your charges
      (beside what I give you) as in my pocket booke, £16 00. 00."

      In 1664, in connection with several of his townsmen, he had liberfy granted him to erect a saw-mill, on the west side of the Connecticut, as appears from the following vote:

      ''Decemb'y 8th, 1664. There is Grannted liberty unto fismuel Msrah-
      fidd^ThomasNoble, Thomas Miller and XUzurHolyoke upon their desires,
      for y* setting up of a saw Mill on a biodk below Ensigne Oooper's farms
      over Agawam River; also there is granted them about Forty acres of
      land where they shall chuse It, neere the place where the Mill shall stand,
      not prjudidng any of y* Inhabitants PMpriety, or the high way: Also
      there is grsunted them thirty acres of Meddow within 2 or 8 mile of y*
      place where Hiey shall fynd H most oonTenient for their use, iii*gii»i one end of their Keddow and soe proceeding tUl 80 acree be made up.
      These grants are on condition that the7 cause a aaw mill to be sett up in
      the place above mentioned A sett to work in Sawing by the first day of
      Apiill w«k shal be in y« yeere 1606. And in case that the said Undertak-
      ers, when fhey have sett up such work, shall see cause to desert the work,
      wth in three yeeres from the^said tyme, th^ shall yield up the place and lands
      hereby graunted, into the hands of y* Town, or such in the town as shall
      carry on y* work, provided these undtakera be paid w* charges they shall
      be at about the Work. Also, they are not restrayned of the liberty of the
      Ccnnons, for all sorts of tymber for their use for Sawing or otherwise."

      At a meeting of the selectmen of Springfield, Jan. 1, 1665 0. e. 1666),
      it is recorded, " This day according to Towne order we considered about
      (making Rates A) takdng a list of y« estate of jT Plantation. And for
      Prizing y* Living Stock of y* Towne we choose Tho. Noble A James
      Warriner."

      Mr. Noble, though a maB of activity and industry, ieems to have
      eiarly fallen into a habit (which it is to be hoped that his descend-
      ants will carefully avoid) of living " beyond his means," and as a
      natural result, soon found himself in debt To secure the sums due
      to Henry Smith and John Pynchon, he was obliged, in 1667, to
      make over to Fynchon his house in Springfield, and all his lands,
      except a grant towards Windsor. In the hope of improving his
      condition, and providing tor the wants of a large and growing
      family, he was therefore ready to join those who were beginning
      a settlement at Westfield. The precise time of his removal to
      that place is not known. The lands there granted to him, JuJ^,
      1666, on condition that he settled upon them before the last
      of May, 1667, having been forfeited by non-settlement^ the grant
      was renewed, Jan. 9, 1668, and the time of settlement extended to
      Nov. 10, 1668. At all events, he was there as early as Jan. 21,
      1669, for at a meeting at "Warronoco, (Westfield,) at that date, it



      " Voted, That Ja. ComiBh, Geo. Phelps, Thomas Dewey and Thomas
      Noble shall go to Springfield the first Tuesday in February next, at a
      Towne meeting, to propound to the Towne for the settlement of our place
      and aflayres, in particular to determine where the lyne shall run betwixt
      Springfield and us, and to appoynt persons to lay out the bounds granted
      us by the honored Gen" Court, and to allow us to be a Township by o'selves
      and signify the same to the honored Qeaf^ Court"

      In his historical sketch of Westfield, Bev. Dr. Emerson Davis-
      states, that Mr. Noble's residence in Westfield was about two and
      a half miles east of the present centre of the town, on the farm

      where his son, Dea. Thomas Noble, atterwarde resided, and
      which remained in the family ontQ after the death, in 1791, of
      his great-grandson, Lieut Stephen Noble, when it passed into the
      possession of Ambrose Day. There, he doubtless lived in peace
      and quiet^ until the commencement of *' Eing Philip's " war, in
      1675. In this war, says Bev. Br. Davis,

      " Mr. Noble was much exposed. One night during fsmily prayers.
      Gray Lock* (an old Indian), stepped up and pulled the string and let the
      door swing open, and as soon as all was quiet, be would pull the string
      again. Mr. Noble was persuaded by his friends to move into town. Gray
      Lock said he had several opportunities of killing most of his children at a
      shot, but did not want scalps as much as captives."

      Having been chosen constable of Westfield, the records of the
      Hampshire county court show, that on the 7th April, 1674, he
      '< was swome to discharge y* s* office,'* which in those days was one
      of honor and trust He took the oath of allegiance to his Majesty,
      Jan. 23, 1678; joined "Westfield church, Feb. 20, 1681; was made
      a freeman, Oct 12, 1681, and at the Hampshire county court, Sept
      26, 1682, took the freeman*s oath.

      The Hampshire county records show that about this tame he
      suffered the penalty of the law for travelling on Fast day:

      "At a County Oorte held at Nortliampton, March 87th, 1688. Thomas
      Noble of Westfield being p'sented by the Grand jury for Travelling on a
      day of Humiliation, publiquely appointed by the Gen" Oorte, which he
      owned, pleading his necessity for Comeing home, and yet this Oo^^ Con-
      sidering said affense, being a growing evil amongst us, many Persons too
      much disregarding such eztraordinaiy Dutys, & Seasons, have adjudged
      sd. Noble to pay as a fine to the County treasurer five shilUngs. "

      In 1684, his name is with the most influential of his townsmen,
      upon the jury of inquest on the body of Elieser "Wellerf of West-

      ?If this wss the chieftain of the Waranokes, Rev. Dr. Davis is ob-
      viously in error in calling him "an 0U Indian/' King Philip's war
      terminated in July, 1676. Temple and Sheldon, in their History of North-
      Held, state, that Gray Lock, the chief of the Waranokes, so called from the
      tfAoT of his hair, was the most prominent chief in Father Ralle's war,
      which raged fifty years later, 1723-M. They say: "He was now well
      advanced in age, but retained all the daring, and tact, and energy of bis
      youth. In 1788, he was living on the shore of Misslquoi bay, at the
      northerly end of Lake Champlain." The only way of reconciling the
      ststement of Rev. Dr. Davis with that of Temple and Sbeldon, is by sup-
      posing, that in 1676, he was prematurely gray, and was at that time really
      young, although from the color of his hair, appearing to be an old man.

      t Sliezer Weller was doubtless s. of Richard and Ann (Wilson) Weller,
      and b. in Windsor, Conn., Kov. 90, 1650.

      field, M appears by the following record of the Hampshire comity
      court:

      ^'Att the Gountie Court held at Springfield, Sept 80, 1684.
      "Nathaniel Wellere p'eented to this Sliezer Wellere of Westfeild late decessed, & made oath to the truth of
      the Inventory, & that if more estate shall appeare, he wil discover it to
      the Ckmntie Ckxrie, & he tbe sd. deceased dying intesUte, in his own selfe
      Knrther, power of administration is granted to ad. Nathaniel Wellere apon
      said estate: And the Inquest made upon sd. £lieser WeUeres death, was
      p^sented to this Co^S & is as followes:
      " Westfeild: 17 Aug. 1684.

      " We whose Names are und' written being desired by the Constable as a
      Jury according to Law, to give or Judgmt on the awful, amazing, and
      untimely death of £liezer Wellere, after due notice taken, we al unani-
      mously agree, that through the strength of temptation he became his own
      Execution', by hanging himself, al signes & circumstances fully concur-
      ring therein, & nothing appearing to the Contrary, to the best of or
      Judgm**, we suppose he might be dead twenty four houres before it was
      known.

      John llaudsley, John Root, Samuel Root,

      Samuel LoomiB, Sen., John Sacket, Jacob Phelps,

      Isaac Phelps, John Ponder, John Williams,

      Thomas Noble, Josiah Dewey, Thomas Dewey.

      "The sevTall psons above subscribed, Sam^ Root excepted, who was
      from home, made oath to what is above written this 10th of Sept, 1684.
      Before me,

      JOHN PTNCHON. AmM:'

      The town of Weetfield, on the 6th of Sept, 1685, granted to
      him, in connection with Isaac Phelps, Nathaniel Weller, and
      David Ashley, liberty to erect a saw-mill < northeast side of the river; " and at the same date, together with
      George Sexton, he was chosen "to join with the Selectmen to
      prize buildings." At a town meeting held Sept 22, 1691, he was
      appointed with Ideut Phelps and John Sacket, << to atend the
      Court upon the town account with respect to the difference
      between our town and SulBeld, and do what they can in the towne*
      behalf settling our bounds between us and SuiBeld.*'

      ''At a town meeting, Mch. 4, 169(, . . . there was
      Granted unto Tho. Noble, Sen**, upon the. plaine knowne by the
      name of tower miles plaine, the contents of halfe a mile Square,
      that is to say the Liberty of the Pines one this pice of Land
      for Boysume, w* is to continue for three years ensuing the date
      heare/'

      The records of Westfield show, that on the 2d of March, 1696,
      he was chosen county surveyor.

      Agriculture, neoeBsaiily the main pursuit of every one in tbe
      early history of a country, was his principal employment^ although
      while at Springfield, during the winter, he worked a portion of
      the time as a tailor.

      At Westfield, he was so much prospered in his labors, as not
      only to bring up a large family of children well, but also to leave
      them at his death a respectable estate.

      A copy of the will of Thomas Noble, executed almost seven
      years before, and proved about seven months after his death,
      recorded in the office of the Hampshire Probate court [Vol. Ill,
      pp. 119-20], together with the inventory, is given below :

      "Tbe last will and testament of Tbomas Koble of Westflcld, in y«
      County of Hampshire, in y Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New
      England, being weak in body, but of perfect understanding.

      " Impr, 1 commend my soul into the hands of Christ my blessed Lord
      sad Saviour, and my body to a christian burial, in full faith of a blessed
      resurrection, through the rich grace of God in Christ my Saviour.

      " Item, I ipve unto my son Thomas, that parcel of land lying in the farm
      purchased from Mr. Jn^. Pynchon, from the gate beyond the house entr-
      ing into the field bounded by the plowing land, the way to Springfield,
      J
      "Item, to my son Matthew, a tract of land in the same farm, lying by
      a ditch esstaly, and bounded at both ends by tbe river.

      "Item, I give unto my sons Mark and Luke, my little meadow, lying
      against the orchard of Noah Cooke, and that homelot that I have bought,
      and they have raisd frames upon.

      "Item, I give the lot that the town gave me on the top of the hill ag*
      my house on tbe same fann, to all my six sons for a pasture.

      " Item, to my son James, a parcel of land and house upon it, on that
      fann that is fenced in, being six or seven acres more or less. .

      " Item, I bequeath the rest of this my farm lying bounded upon James
      Borth'ly, Thomas on the east, Matthew on the south'ly, y* river on the.
      wcstly sides, to all my sons, i. e, to my sons John, Thomas, Matthew,
      Mark, Luke, and James, equally to be divided amongst them by my
      brother James Warriner, and John Hitchcock of Springfield, and by Capt.
      Isaac Phelps of Westfield.

      "Item, I give to my son James, all my land in the plain, on this side
      the hundred acres, and the lot by the way to Pochastuck.

      "Item, I give to my son John, the rest of my lot in y fort meadow.

      " Item, I give unto my beloved wife, Hannah Noble, an acre of land
      ressrved out of my son John's homelot; also half my dwelling house,
      that is to say, that end next the street, and halfe the land and orchard and
      ham we dwell on, and the other halfe of the house lot and bam to my son
      James, as also the thirds of all that I here wiU to my sons, and after her
      decease, I give my son James the whole of the house, houselot, and bam,
      and the acre re s e rved out of my son John's homelot.
      _ "Item, 1 five unto my four daughters, Hannah, Elizabeth, Maiy, and

      Rebecca, £90 apiece, to be paid tbem by my aons (viz.), Tbomaa, Mat-
      thew, Kai^, Luke, and James, to Mar}' and to Rebeccah aboat half a year
      after their marriage, and a cow apiece at their marriage. And in case
      any of my children should dye, not leaving any issue behind them, then
      my will is that the legacies that I here give them, be equally divided
      among the surviving, and also, I order these my sons to And my wife
      fewel wood, and two load of hay ev«ry year, so long as she shall remain
      widdow.

      " Item, I give unto my wife also a cow and an heifer, also all my house-
      hold goods, which household goods I would have her at her pleasure dis-
      pose of to my two youngest daughters.

      "Item, my team (one yoak of oxen excepted), I give unto my three
      youngest sons, MariL, Luke, and James. And for the well and faithful
      execution of this my last will, I ordain and make my beloved wife Han-
      nah Noble and my son Thomas Noble Joynt executors, to defray all my
      lawfull debts, and for that end leave one yoak of working cattle, a yoak
      of fatt oxen, and the money in the Bay due to me, and all other dues, the
      which, when my debts are defray^, the remainder I would have to go to
      pay my daughter's portions. But in case the same should be too little to
      clear my due debts, that then they are to raise what is sufficient out of the
      legacies I have here given to my children, to do the same. In witness
      whereof I set to my hand and seal this eleventh day of May, An« Dom.,
      1697.

      THOMAS NOBLE and a [Bbal]."
      " Signed A sealed in the pvesence off
      Sdwabd Tatlob,

      y XOTOBT SXKBS,

      jAioa Wabbirbb.''



      In Springfield, Sept: 5th, 1704.
      ' Mr. Edward Taylor and Victory Sikee, two of the witnesses to this
      inatrument, appeared before the Judge of Probates in Hampshire, viz.,
      Samuel Partridge, Esq., and made oath that they saw Thomas Noble,
      deoeas^, sign and seal the s< instrument, as his last will and testament,
      and that he was of a sound mind and memory, when he did it, according
      to there Judgment, and that th^ with James Warriner signd as witnesses
      to the same, in the testaturs' presence. Which b4 will (the executors
      therein named having accepted s* trust), was by the s' Judge approved
      and allowed of.

      Attest, JOHN PTNGHON, Regt.



      An inventory of the estate of Thomas Noble, Sen' of Westfield, de-
      ceased, taken Febru>y y 18th, 170|.

      Imp^. £ s. d.

      To a house and bam and homestead in the town plott, . 085 00 00

      To a lot in the plain by estimation eleven acres, . 086 00 00

      To four acres of land in the fort meadow, . . 006 00 00

      To six acres of upland or pastureing, . Old 00 00

      £ t. If.

      To an acre of homelot land in the town plait, . 018 00 00

      To ninety acres of land in the fann, . . 270 00 00

      To fifty acres of upland or thereabouts called the pasture,

      lying against the farm 005 00 00

      To the old buildings upon the farm, . . 002 00 00

      To two aad one halfe acres of land with a frame upon it

      ca]« Mark's homstead, . 010 00 00

      To two acres ot homelot land near the Wid« Dewey's, . 005 00 00
      To a yoak of three yearcs old steers at £5, . . 005 00 00

      To two cows, and one calfe at £5; and a heifer and 2 steers

      at£815t. 008 15 00

      To a horse at £2 10«. and dx swine at £2, . . 004 10 00

      To a cart at £1 12f., and plow and plow chain at £1 5«., to-
      gether with half other implements belonging to the team

      £1 14f.; and y« halfe of a Umber chain at 18d., . . 004 14 00

      To axes, hatchels, howes, and forks at 18tf., and hay knife

      ? and pease hooks 4d., 001 02 00

      To wareing apparel £8; and armes, and ammunition £1 15«. ;

      and bed, bolster, and 2 pillows at £2 Ids., and a rugg

      and bknketts £1101., 007 11 00

      To 4 toe ruggs £1 4f., an^ a blankett 4f. ; 2 down beds and

      2 bolsters at £12i., 002 10 00

      To two pillows 7«., and curiaines and valiants 15«., and 4 *

      bedsteads and cords £18f., . 002 06 00

      To 1 dosa of napkins, and 2 table doathes, and 8 towels,

      £18t.; and 5 pillow beers 8«., . 001 16 00

      To nine aheeU £1 16«., and 8 large pewter platters £1 4f.,

      and 6 plates a 16s., - . 008 16 00

      To old pewter 18f. and a tankerd, and 2 porringers and aalt

      cellars*., 001 01 00

      To brass kittles and skilleU and wanning pann, . 001 16 00

      To an iron pot and kitUes £1 2f., and tin and earthen ware

      6t. i)01 06 00

      To pott hooks, trammels and Are irons and chafen dish 18f.', 000 18 00
      To barrels, tubbs, chaires, and wheels, and aome other small

      things, £1 16«., 001 16 00

      Topailes, bowls, diahea, trenchers, q>oons, and cannl8f., . 000 18 00
      Towheat, peas, lye, Indian com; and oates £7 Of. 6d., . 007 00 06
      To wool, flax, and sacks, £1 6s. ; and chests, boxes, hookes,

      and halchels £1 16«., 008 00 00

      To a ahorel, fiying pann, and bridle, and aadle 18f. ; and

      provision in y« house £1 10s., . 002 08 00

      To sdeths, sickles, and sdeth tackling 6t., . . 000 06 00

      To beetle rings, and wedges, and other small things, 6«., and

      2 bb of tnipentine at £1 lOd,, and linnen, and woolen

      yam, 8a., 002 08 00

      Totall, £448 06*. 06d.

      p^ Isaac Phelps, Nath^ WeUar, Joa. Bexton.

      " Hampsh* 68. Bpbikgfield Sbftbm* 5tb 1704.

      " Hannah Noble wid* and Thomas Noble, executors of the hwt will
      and testament of Thomas Noble (l^te of Westileld deceas«) made oath
      before Sami Partridge, Esqr., Judge of the Probate of wills &c fors*
      County, thai the within is a true inventory of the estate ot s* decease, lo
      far as they know of, and if more appear, they will readily make disooveiy
      thereof from time to time, to s* Judge, or his successors.

      Attest, JOHN PYNCHON, ile^."



      "April 8th 1704. A division of a oerUin tract of land among the six
      sons of the decease Thomas Noble of Westfleld, who dyed the 21st of
      Janury 170|, the land lyes about the middle of the farm, that the dec«
      Thomas Noble bought of Mr. Pynchon, the quantity is about sixty-seven I

      acres. It lyes by the river southeast, and norwest by a ditch which parts .^

      James Noble's pasture land from this dividing line, the northeast end
      buts upon the old cartway that goes through or that went through the
      S4 farm to Springfield, the southeast end buts on the old ditch or the
      land of Matthew Noble. It is divided in two divisions. The first divis-
      ion begins two foot to the norwest side of the first rowe of apple trees.

      The first lot in that division was laid out for Thomas, which was 13
      rod broad.

      The 2 for James, four rods and 7 foots, 4 broad.

      The 8 for Matthew, twelve rod, 12 broad.

      The 4 for Luke, nineteen rod, 19 broad.

      The 5 for John, fourteen rod, 14 broad.

      The 6 for Mark, that is all from John's lot to the river south, east and
      Doreast to a smaU brook of water that runs between John's land, and the
      dividing land. The second division runs from the upper rowe of apple
      trees to the ditch norwest

      The first lot was laid for Thomas, and it is three rod broad.

      2. John was four, 8 rod and almost half e.

      8. Mark six, 6 rod.

      4. James eighteen, 18 rod.

      5. Matthew thirteen, 18 rod or fourteen.

      We who are the sons of the deceased Thomas Noble, do all of .us agree
      to take up satisfied with the above division, (with good likeing,) of Isaac
      Phelps, James Warriner, John Hitchcock, who are the distributors.

      JOHN NOBLE,
      THOMAS NOBLE,
      as witness our hands, MATTHEW NOBLE,

      ItiLAC Phblpb, mare NOBLE,

      Jameb Wabrihsr, LUKE NOBLE,

      JoHH HiTCBoocK. JAMBS NOBLE."

      He m. Nov. 1, 1660, Hannah Warriner, b. in Springfield,
      Mass., Aug. 17, 1643, only dau. of William and Joanna (Scant)
      Warriner. She joined the Westfield church, Nov. 1 1, 1680. She

      m. (2) Jan. 24, 1705, Dea. Medad Pomeroy of Northampton, Mass., bapt. in Windsor, Conn., Aug. 19, 1638, s. of Eltweed Pomeroy. The Westfield church records show, that "Sister Noble, widow of brother Thomas Noble, being married again to Mr. Medad Pomeroy of Northampton, and settled with him
      there, was dismissed to Northampton, about the end of April,
      1705." Medad Pomeroy was a blacksmith, and town clerk for many years, deacon, and representative 1677, '83, '84, '86, '90, '92, a man of large wealth for the times, and much influence. [He
      m. (1) Nov. 21, 1661, Experience Woodward, dau. of
      Henry Woodward of Dorchester and Northampton. She d. June 8, 1686; (2) Sept 8, 1686, Mrs. Abigail Chauncy, dau. of Jolm and Abigail (Ford) Strong of Northampton, Mass., and wid. of Rev. Nathaniel Chauncy of Hatfield. She d. April
      15, 1704.] Medad Pomeroy d. in Northampton, Dec. 30, 1716, m, 78. She survived Dea. Pomeroy, who, in his will dated Jan. 4, 1709, and proved Jan. 5; 1717, makes the not very liberal provision, that at his decease, she "shall have liberty to choose what cow she will out of y« cows w«^ I shall then have, to be her own, and alsoe to have returned to her all such things as she brought"
      The date of her death is not recorded, and it is only known that it occurred prior to May 12, 1721.

      CHILDREN.

      8. John;. . b. March 6, 1662; m. (1) A. Backet; (2) M. Goodman.

      a :Hannah, b. Feb. 24, 1664; m. (1) J. Goodman; (2) N. Edwards; (3) A. Partridge.

      4. Thomas, b. Jan. 14, 1666; m. Elizabeth Dewey.

      6. Matthew, b. .; m. Hannah Dewey.

      6. Mark, b. ; m; Mary Marshall.

      7. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 9, 1678; m. (1) R Church; (2) S. Loomis.

      8. Luke, b. July 16, 1676; m. Hannah Stebbins.

      9. James, b. Oct. 1. 1677; m. (1) Ruth __ ; (2) C. Higley.

      10. Mary. b. June 29, 1680; m. Ephraim Colton.

      11. Rebecca, b. Jan. 4, 1688; m. Samuel Loomis.



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