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1

Obituary:

Elisabeth Post Morrow 1896 - 1992
by Dorothy Jones and Faith McCutcheon

Elisabeth Post Morrow, quiet philanthropist and generous supporter of our community, died at her home on February 26th, after a long illness.

She was born in Brooklyn in 1896, graduated from Packer Collegiate Institute, married Thomas Irwin Morrow in 1920, had one daughter, Elisabeth, and spent much of her life in Brookhaven.

Mr. and Mrs. Morrow were both genuinely interested in everything to do with Brookhaven and its environs and were staunch generous supporters of all the local institutions. Elisabeth was especially interested in the Brookhaven Free Library whose site and building were donate by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Post, and which has always been the recipient of her generous support.

Mrs. Morrow was a charter member of the Fireplace Literary Club and the Bellport-Brookhaven Historical society as well as a Trustee of the Packer Institute in Brooklyn. She had many other interests,including music (especially opera), books and printing, birds, and local natural areas. Before braille was done by machine, Elisabeth copied books in braille for the blind.

Brookhaven has lost one of its outstanding public-spirited citizens, whose memory will live on through her many contributions to the well-being of the community and the Post-Morrow Foundation, established to preserve the rural atmosphere of our locality.

Thanks to Dorothy Jones and Faith McCutcheon for writing this article. 
Post, Elisabeth C. (I36365)
 
2
HeritageQuest
1930 Census; California Township, Branch County, Michigan
Series: T626 Roll: 977 Page: 66
ED No. 12-7; SD No. 16; Sheet No. 1A; April 2-3, 1930
18/18
Lawrence, Nona, Head, F, W, 44, Wd, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, None
Lawrence, Hannah, Mother-in-law, F, W, 74, Wd, Michigan, Michigan, New York, None
(next page)
18/18
Sackett, James H., Father, M, W, 74, Wd, Michigan, New York, New York, Farmer, General Farm
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http://www.co.branch.mi.us/deathsearch.
Branch Co.
SACKETT, JAMES H.; NOVEMBER 30, 1935
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Source: Cemetery Inscriptions Branch County, MI Vol. IV; Oak Grove Cem., Coldwater, MI.
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Find A Grave Memorial
James H Sackett
Birth: 1855; Moscow, Hillsdale County, Michigan, USA
Death: Dec. 1, 1935[sic][Nov. 30]; California, Branch County, Michigan, USA
Burial: Dec. 1, 1935
Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Branch County, Michigan, USA

h/o Ella V Harrington

Family links:
Spouse:
Ella V. Sackett (1856 - 1921)

Created by: Alvin Oglesby
Record added: Oct 29, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 43684661
Headstone picture added by: Jeff Whitehead 
Sackett, James H. (I15974)
 
3
Name: Harry Sackett
Death date: 24 Feb 1944
Death place: Coleman County, Texas
Gender: Male
Race or color (on document):
Age at death: 41 years 1 month
Estimated birth year: 1903
Birth date: Feb 23, 1903
Birth place: Burkett, Texas
Marital status: Married
Spouse name:
Father name: Henry Sackett
Father birth place: Texas
Mother name: Estelle Nichols
Mother birth place: Ala.
Occupation: Life Insurance
Residence: 411 W. Walnut St. Coleman, Coleman, Texas
Cemetery name: [Coleman Cemetery]
Burial place: Coleman
Burial date: 2 - 25 1944
Additional relatives:
Film number: 2137702
Digital GS number: 4029606
Image number: 2815
Reference number: 7253
Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976
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http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jrterry/colemancounty/cemeteries/coleman-mp11.html
MAP PAGE 11 - SECTIONS 37, 38 & 39
38 - lot 2:
SACKETT, Harry - 1903 - 1944 
Sackett, Harry (I64857)
 
4
Obituary: New York Times. 6 Mar 1944.

MRS. JAMES H. POST
Daughter of Pastor Dies 6 Years to Day After Husband

Mrs. Louisa Wells Post died yesterday at her home, 88 Remsen Street, Brooklyn, six years to the day after the death of her husband, James H. Post, sugar refiner and philanthropist, who was president if the National Sugar Refining company of New Jersey and first president of the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies. They were married in 1887, two years before Mr. Post became a partner in thefirm of B. H. Howell Son & Co., molasses and sugar dealers, which he had entered as an office boy.

Mrs. Post was a daughter of the Rev. John D. Wells, for fifty years pastor of the South Third Street Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn. She had long been interested in Presbyterian missions and had served as corresponding secretary of the Brooklyn Y.M.C.A.

She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Philip A. Hubert of Summit, N.J.; Mrs. Thomas I. Morrow and Miss Jessie W. Post of Brooklyn. Mr. Post died in the Remsen Street house at the age of 78.

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It is said that when Louisa Wells Post died in 1944, her unmarried daughter Jessie inherited the Post properties in Brookhaven, NY. On Jessie's death in 1950, the Brookhaven property was inherited by her sister, Elizabeth Post Morrow. 
Wells, Louisa Henderson (I64306)
 
5
The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 12

Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Kruger Shepard. DAR ID Number: 11243. Born in Germany. Wife of George Bohan Shepard.

Descendant of Col. Abraham Hasbrouck and of Col. Joseph Hasbrouck, of New York.
Daughter of Richard Kruger and Louisa Hasbrouck, his wife.
Granddaughter of Louis Hasbrouck and Catharine Banks, his wife.

(See No. 11240. - Laura M. Hasbrouck)

Miss Laura M. Hasbrouck. DAR ID Number: 11240 Born in New York.

Descendant of Col. Abraham Hasbrouck, Col. Joseph Hasbrouck, Maj. Jacob Hasbrouck, Jr., Lieut. Josiah Hasbrouck and Capt. Philip Du Bois Bevier, of New York.

Daughter of Louis Hasbrouck and Sarah Maria Hasbrouck, his wife.

Granddaughter of Louis Hasbrouck and Catherine Banks, his wife; Levi Hasbrouck and Hylah Bevier, his wife.

Gr.-granddaughter of Joseph Hasbrouck and Elizabeth Bevier, his wife; Josiah Hasbrouck and Sarah Decker, his wife; Philip Du Bois Bevier and Anne De Witt, his wife.

Gr.-gr.-granddaughter of Abraham Hasbrouck and Cathrine Bruyn, his wife; Jacob Hasbrouck, Jr., and Jannetje Du Bois, his wife. Abraham Hasbrouck (1707-1791), served in the Provincial Congress, in the Assembly, and as colonel of militia.

Joseph Hasbrouck (1743-1808) was an officer of the Third Ulster County Regiment.

Jacob Hasbrouck, Jr., (1728-1806), commanded a company under Col. Levi Pawling, and was major of the regiment.
[p.94] Josiah Hasbrouck (1755-1821), served as licutenant under Col. John Cantine, 1780, in the Ulster county militia. Also Nos. 620, 1302, 1768, 2172, 4967, 7938, 8246, 9258, 9791.

Philip Du Bois Bevier (1751-1802), served as lieutenant at Quebec, 1775, and, 1776, was promoted captain of Col.
Lewis Du Bois' regiment. Also Nos. 4967, 7939. 
Kruger, Jane Elizabeth (I4798)
 
6

Burial:
Midland City Cemetery
Midland
Midland County
Michigan, USA
Plot: section t

Created by: Rose
Record added: Nov 30, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 120989653
Headstone added by ROSE
 
Roe, Jesse D. (I10726)
 
7
-------
Find A Grave Memorial
Birth: Jun. 18, 1843 St. Clair County Illinois, USA
Death: Sep. 3, 1921 Winfield Cowley County Kansas, USA
Family links:
Parents: Myron Sackett (1809 - 1903)
Elizabeth Hill Sackett (1813 - 1852)
Spouse: William Francis Miller (1848 - 1925)
Children: Teresa E. Miller Allen (1874 - 1965)*
Siblings:
Sarah Ann Sackett Dixon (1834 - 1860)*
Mary Catherine Sackett Tiry (1835 - 1914)*
Jonathan Hill Sackett (1841 - 1865)*
Zady Catherine Sackett Miller (1843 - 1921)
John Henry Sackett (1848 - 1924)*
Phoebe Elinor Sackett Brown (1851 - 1882)*
Nancy E. Sackett (1857 - 1857)**
Infant Sackett (1863 - 1863)**

**Half-sibling
Inscription: His Wife. S/W W.F. Miller

Burial: Tisdale Cemetery Tisdale Cowley County
Kansas, USA

Created by: Heather Helpingstine
Record added: Mar 13, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 18376029
1 headstone picture
photo added by Heather Helpingstine

 
Sackett, Zady Catherine (I15508)
 
8
Find A Grave Memorial

Birth: 1917
Death: 1946

Burial: Decatur Cemetery Decatur Adams County Indiana, USA

Created by: Jim Cox
Record added: Aug 14, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 40671933

1 Headstone picture by Deb Curry 
Winans, Frieda L (I38610)
 
9
Alanna Marie "Lil Al" Sackett (2000 - 2014)
VINTON -- Alanna Marie "Lil Al" Sackett, 13, died Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at St. Luke's Hospital in Cedar Rapids following a brief illness.
Funeral Services will be held at 10 a.m., Monday, January 13, 2014 at St. John Lutheran Church in Center Point with Pastor David Hansen officiating. Interment will be held at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery near Urbana. Visitation will be held at the church from 2 to 5 p.m., on Sunday. A Memorial fund has been established.
Alanna was born July 18, 2000 at Cedar Rapids to Joan (Sand) Sackett and Blake Sackett. A sixth grade student at Center Point-Urbana School, she participated in activities of the Arc of East Central Iowa Program, loved fishing, and attending her sisters' 4-H and sporting events
She is survived by her mother Joan L. Sand Sackett, and Alanna's special friend, Scott Young; her sisters, Kayla and Rachael Sackett and nephew, Ryan, all of Vinton; her father, Blake (Angie) Sackett of Walker; and her grandparents, Letha Sand and Norman and Zelda Sackett.
Phillips Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements and condolences may be left at: www.phillipsfuneralhomes.com 
Sackett, Alanna Marie (I39181)
 
10
Burial:
Lindenwood Cemetery
Fort Wayne
Allen County
Indiana, USA

Created by: OPPSheryl
Record added: Mar 31, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 87747941
Headstone photo added by OPPSheryl
 
Winans, Charles E (I38611)
 
11
Descendants Sackett Family Association descendants of Annie Catherine Dowker Sackett and Edward Baylis:
Sheila Phythian.

Charts Tree 3. Thomas Sackett the elder descendant chart (English line)
Descendants of Benjamin Sackett
 
Sackett, Annie Catherine Dowker (I16779)
 
12
Elezan Frank Roe
Burial:
Pleasant Mills Cemetery, Pleasant Mills, Adams County, Indana, USA

Created by: Jim Cox
Record added: Oct 31, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 60912249
Headstone photo added by Deb Curry
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=60912249&PIpi=106243060">Headstone picture added by: Deb Curry

 
Frank, Elezan (I10013)
 
13
From Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864-2007 (FamilySearch.org)
The Times-News
Twin Falls, Idaho
8 Sep 2011

Sackett, Larry R.

Larry R. Sackett, 79, formerly of Filer and Twin Falls, passed away Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, in Yuma, Ariz., from a short-term illness.

Larry was a devoted husband, father and grandfather. He was born to Orville and Ruth Sackett in Filer on Feb. 21, 1932. He attended Moroa School through grade school then off to the Filer schools. As a young man, he worked on the family farm. In 1949, he married Dora Jean Stutzman. They had two children. They were later divorced. In 1953, he joined the army as was stationed in Germany. He was honorably discharged in 1955. Upon his return home, he returned to the family farm. in 1960, he married Pat Pierson. She had three children, which he raised as his own. Larry and Pat had one daughter.

Larry is survived by his wife, Pat of 51 years, his children, Rex (Sharon) Sackett, Dona (Ed) Fuchs, Dough (Judy) Pollow, Debbie (Mike) Randall, Sande Miller and Lori Schmahl (Randy Lemmons); and five grandchildren, Sara and Joe Randall, Meagan and Ryan Miller, and Jake Schmahl. He is also survived by his siblings, Gloria (Gene) Schiffler, Nancy Montgomery, and O.D. (Barbara) Sackett; and many nieces and nephews.

The family requests that donations be made to the American Heart Association, Diabetes Association, Parkinson's Research or the donor's favorite charity.

A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, at Rosenau Funeral Home. Family and friends are encouraged to share their memories at www.rosenaufuneralhome.com.  
Sackett, Larry Ray (I13194)
 
14
From Polly Barnes:
Alzina Thankful Sackett was born 21 FEB 1836 in Greene, Chenango Ct, N.Y., and died 17 NOV 1906 in Antrim Ct, MI. She married Alva D. Greene 1 JAN 1856.

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1860 Census, enumerated in Smithville, Chenango, New York, United States
Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Alvah D Greene M 26 New York
Alvina Greene F 24 New York
Oliver E Greene M 4 New York
Esther M Greene F 3 New York
Household ID: 808 , GS Film Number: 803734 , Digital Folder Number: 004235902 , Image Number: 00488

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1870 Census, enumerated 7 Jul 1870 in Greene, Chenango, New York, USA
Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Esther Sacket F 63 New York
Alvina Greene F 34 New York
Esther H Greene F 12 New York
George D Greene M 10 New York
Household ID: 112 , Line Number: 4 , Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) , Affiliate Publication Number: M593 , GS Film number: 000552415 , Digital Folder Number: 004274899 , Image Number: 00206

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1880 Census, enumerated 18 Jun 1880 in Forest Home, Antrim, Michigan, United States
Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Alzina Greene Self F 44 New York, United States
Oliver Greene Son M 23 New York, United States
James Greene Son M 20 New York, United States
Ester Greene Daughter F 22 New York, United States
District: 28 , Sheet Number and Letter: 561D , GS Film Number: 1254570 , Digital Folder Number: 004241652 , Image Number: 00248

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1900 Census, enumerated 14 Apr 1900 in Forest Home township, Antrim, Michigan, United States

Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Oliver E Green Head M 44 New York b. Nov 1856
Alzina D Green Mother F 64 New York b. Feb 1836
Annie M Green Cousin F 14 Michigan b. May 1886
District: 7 , Sheet Number and Letter: 5B , Household ID: 101 , Line Number: 68 , Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) , Affiliate Publication Number: T623 , GS Film Number: 1240699 , Digital Folder Number: 004119837 , Image Number: 00614

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Michigan, Deaths and Burials, 1800-1995
Name: Alzina T. Green
Gender: Female
Death Date: 17 Nov 1906
Death Place: Antrim Co., Michigan
Age: 70
Birth Date: 1836
Birthplace: New York
Occupation: Housekeeper
Race: White
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Name: Oliver Sackett
Mother's Name: Ester Wing
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: B51834-7 , System Origin: Michigan-EASy , GS Film number: 980363 , Reference ID: v 2 p 20

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From Find A Grave Memorial# 75656881
Alzina T Greene
Birth: Feb. 21, 1836
Death: Nov. 17, 1906


Burial:
Lakeview Cemetery
Bellaire
Antrim County
Michigan, USA

Created by: tammy
Record added: Aug 29, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 75656881 
Sackett, Alzina Thankful (I22974)
 
15
James Marsh married Mary Lillian McDonell.1 James Marsh, son of James George Marsh and Emma Hogbin, was born in Thanet, Kent, on 12 February 1871.2,3 He died in British Columbia, Canada, on 29 March 1944.3


Gallery Phoebe Sackett gallery

Charts Descendants of Phoebe Sackett and John Hogbin

Reference Q.3


Notes & Citations
1.Email from Helen Jeffries to Chris Sackett, January 2013.
2.Website England & Wales Birth Index (GRO Civil Registration Index) (Ancestry.com) (http://search.ancestry.co.uk/), "Mar qtr 1871. Marsh, James. Thanet. 2a:841."
3.Helen Jeffries, "Jeffries Family Tree", Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk).
 
Marsh, James (I39273)
 
16
Kate Florence "Flossie" Marsh, daughter of James George Marsh and Emma Hogbin, was born in Broadstairs, Kent, in 1879.1,2 She died in Purley, Surrey, on 8 August 1967.3 She married Benjamin Edwin Springett.
In 1891 Kate was living at 7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter in Thanet, Kent, in the household of her parents James and Emma, and was recorded in the census as Kate Florence Marsh, a scholar, aged 12 and born in Broadstairs.4
In 1901 she was living at 7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London, in the household of her parents James and Emma, and was recorded as Kate F Marsh, a post office telegraphist, single, aged 22 and born in Broadstairs.5


Gallery Phoebe Sackett gallery

Charts Descendants of Phoebe Sackett and John Hogbin

Reference Q.3


Notes & Citations
1.Census.
2.GRO Indexes to Births, 1837 to date (FreeBMD), "Jun qtr 1879. Marsh, Kate Florence. Thanet. 2a:847."
3.Helen Jeffries, "Jeffries Family Tree", Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk).
4.1891 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG12, piece 733, folio 39, p. 6, GSU roll 6095843
7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter's, Kent
James Geo Marsh, head, married, 42, bathing machine proprietor, employer, b. Kent, Canterbury
Emma Marsh, wife, 43, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Emma Marsh, dau, 17, pupil teacher, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith Mary Marsh, dau, 13, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate Florence Marsh, dau, 12, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver William Marsh, son, 9, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector Charles Marsh, son, 8, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Flora Alice Marsh, dau, 7, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 5, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
5.1901 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG13, piece 498, folio 128, p. 47
7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London
James G Marsh, head, married, 52, sea bathing establishment, employer, b. Kent, St Stephens
Emma Marsh, wife, 53, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Arthur J Marsh, son, single, 26, grocer's assistant, worker, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith M Marsh, dau, single, 23, clerk, sub post office, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate F Marsh, dau, single, 22, telegraphist GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver W Marsh, son, single, 19, carpenter, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector C Marsh, son, single, 18, clerk mercantile, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Nora A M Marsh, dau, 17, telegraph learner GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 15, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
 
Marsh, Kate Florence (I39237)
 
17
Name:
Mary M. High

Birth Date:
28 Mar 1823

Death Date:
11 Sep 1891

Cemetery:
Charleston Cemetery

Burial or Cremation Place:
Volinia, Cass County, Michigan, USA

Has Bio?:
N

Spouse:
Oliver R. High

Children:
Martha Olivia Ickes
Ezekiel High

URL:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-...
 
Little, Mary Maria (I64512)
 
18
Nora Alice Marion Marsh, daughter of James George Marsh and Emma Hogbin, was born in Broadstairs, Kent, on 9 February 1884.1,2,3 She died aged 53 in Auckland, New Zealand, on 26 November 1937.3 She married in Thanet, Kent, in 1912, William Stewart Putwain.4,5,3
In 1891 Nora was living at 7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter in Thanet, Kent, in the household of her parents James and Emma, and was recorded in the census as Flora [sic] Alice Marsh, a scholar, aged seven and born in Broadstairs.6
In 1901 she was living at 7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London, in the household of her parents James and Emma, and was recorded as Nora A M Marsh, a post office trainee telegraphist, aged 17 and born in Broadstairs.7
In 1911 she was living at 57 Avondale Road, Peckham, London, and was recorded as Nora Alice Marion Marsh, a Post Office counter clerk and telegraphist, single, aged 27 and born in Broadstairs. She was one of five boarders in the household of Martha Acland, 54.8


Gallery Phoebe Sackett gallery

Charts Descendants of Phoebe Sackett and John Hogbin

Reference Q.3


Notes & Citations
1.Census.
2.GRO Indexes to Births, 1837 to date (FreeBMD), "Mar qtr 1884. Marsh, Nora Alice M. Thanet. 2a:957."
3.Helen Jeffries, "Jeffries Family Tree", Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk).
4.GRO Indexes to Marriages, 1837 to date (Ancestry.co.uk), "Mar qtr 1912. Marsh, Nora A M. Spouse: Putwain. Thanet. 2a:1477."
5.GRO Indexes to Marriages, 1837 to date (Ancestry.co.uk), "Mar qtr 1912. Putwain, William S. Spouse: Marsh. Thanet. 2a:1477."
6.1891 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG12, piece 733, folio 39, p. 6, GSU roll 6095843
7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter's, Kent
James Geo Marsh, head, married, 42, bathing machine proprietor, employer, b. Kent, Canterbury
Emma Marsh, wife, 43, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Emma Marsh, dau, 17, pupil teacher, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith Mary Marsh, dau, 13, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate Florence Marsh, dau, 12, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver William Marsh, son, 9, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector Charles Marsh, son, 8, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Flora Alice Marsh, dau, 7, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 5, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
7.1901 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG13, piece 498, folio 128, p. 47
7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London
James G Marsh, head, married, 52, sea bathing establishment, employer, b. Kent, St Stephens
Emma Marsh, wife, 53, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Arthur J Marsh, son, single, 26, grocer's assistant, worker, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith M Marsh, dau, single, 23, clerk, sub post office, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate F Marsh, dau, single, 22, telegraphist GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver W Marsh, son, single, 19, carpenter, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector C Marsh, son, single, 18, clerk mercantile, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Nora A M Marsh, dau, 17, telegraph learner GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 15, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
8.1911 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG14, piece 2516
57 Avondale Road, Peckham, London SE
7 rooms
Nora Alice Marion Marsh, boarder, 27, single, counter clerk & telegraphist, civil service PO, worker, b. Broadstairs, Kent.
[One of five boarders in household of Martha Acland, 54, & dau Elizabeth Ann Acland, 26]
 
Marsh, Nora Alice Marion (I39240)
 
19
Oliver William Marsh, son of James George Marsh and Emma Hogbin, was born in Broadstairs, Kent, in 1881.1,2 He died aged 83 in Thanet, Kent, in 1964.3 He married at St Paul, Westminster Bridge Road, Southwark, London, on 14 May 1905, Eleanor Margaret Kauffman, daughter of Abraham Kauffman.4
In 1891 Oliver was living at 7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter in Thanet, Kent, in the household of his parents James and Emma, and was recorded in the census as Oliver William Marsh, a scholar, aged nine and born in Broadstairs.5
In 1901 he was living at 7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London, in the household of his parents James and Emma, and was recorded as Oliver W Marsh, a carpenter, aged 19 and born in Broadstairs.6
In 1911 he was living at 2 Rectory Road, Broadstairs, Kent, and was recorded as Oliver William Marsh, manager of a sea bathing establishment, head of household, married, aged 29 and born in Broadstairs. Living with him were his wife Eleanor, 31, and their son Charlie, aged three.7


(1911 census)


Child of Oliver William Marsh and Eleanor Margaret Kauffman
i.Charlie Oliver Marsh b. c 1908


Gallery Phoebe Sackett gallery

Charts Descendants of Phoebe Sackett and John Hogbin

Reference Q.3


Notes & Citations
1.Census.
2.GRO Indexes to Births, 1837 to date (FreeBMD), "Jun qtr 1881. Marsh, Oliver William. Thanet. 2a:903."
3.Website England & Wales Death Index, 1916?2005 (GRO Civil Registration Index) (Ancestry.com) (http://search.ancestry.co.uk/), "Sep qtr 1964. Marsh, Oliver W, 83. Thanet. 5b:819."
4.Marriages Register, St Paul, Westminster Bridge Road, Southwark, London (image on Ancestry.co.uk), "14 May 1905, Oliver William Marsh, 24, bachelor, sanitary inspector, of 1 Townley Rd, East Dulwich, father James George Marsh (deceased), baker; to Eleanor Margaret Kauffman, 26, spinster, of 195 Waterloo Rd, father Abraham Kauffman, jeweller. Banns. Witnesses: Nora Alice Marion Marsh, Ada E D?."
5.1891 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG12, piece 733, folio 39, p. 6, GSU roll 6095843
7 & 8 Clarendon Road, St Peter's, Kent
James Geo Marsh, head, married, 42, bathing machine proprietor, employer, b. Kent, Canterbury
Emma Marsh, wife, 43, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Emma Marsh, dau, 17, pupil teacher, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith Mary Marsh, dau, 13, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate Florence Marsh, dau, 12, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver William Marsh, son, 9, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector Charles Marsh, son, 8, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Flora Alice Marsh, dau, 7, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 5, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
6.1901 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG13, piece 498, folio 128, p. 47
7 Lordship Lane, Camberwell, London
James G Marsh, head, married, 52, sea bathing establishment, employer, b. Kent, St Stephens
Emma Marsh, wife, 53, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Arthur J Marsh, son, single, 26, grocer's assistant, worker, b. Kent, Ramsgate
Edith M Marsh, dau, single, 23, clerk, sub post office, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Kate F Marsh, dau, single, 22, telegraphist GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Oliver W Marsh, son, single, 19, carpenter, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Hector C Marsh, son, single, 18, clerk mercantile, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Nora A M Marsh, dau, 17, telegraph learner GPO civil service, worker, b. Kent, Broadstairs
Donald A S Marsh, son, 15, scholar, b. Kent, Broadstairs.
7.1911 England census, digital image from National Archives microfilm, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.co.uk), RG14, piece 4504, schedule 269
2 Rectory Rd, Broadstairs, Kent
6 rooms
Oliver William Marsh, head, 29, married, manager sea bathing establishment, b. Broadstairs
Eleanor Margaret Marsh, wife, 31, m. 5y, 1 ch, living, b. London, Lambeth
Charlie Oliver Marsh, son, 3, b. Broadstairs.
 
Marsh, Oliver William (I39238)
 
20 Herman's brother, Harvey Stillman Greene, is my 2G grandfather. Harvey married Fidelia Balcom and her side of the family is well documented. The Greenes on the other hand have presented problems.
What is known about Samuel. He bought land from Holland Land Co. in 1838. He and several others attempted to establish a Free-will Baptist Society, with limited success. This reportedly caused some problems with the mostly Methodist family members. Census records of his children show that he was born in Vermont.
Have had reports that Samuel commited suicide following some marital indiscretion. (? his or his wife's). Have been unable to document this at all. His wife Elinor Ferguson is not the Elinor Sutton that some online info shows. Military records of her sons report her last name as Ferguson.
Other issues about Samuel. Family lore says that Samuel's initial property was in Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co. Supposedly this is the grape farm that ended up as his son Lafe's farm. Can't prove (or disprove) this. Family research done by Harvey's son Clayton, and granddaughter Ruth & Clarice, reported that church history indicated that Samuel was called Jr. and Samuel F was called Sr, to differentiate them by age, but that they were not related. Clayton remembered that their[sic] was a cousin or brother of Samuel's named Charles. It appears that there was also some relationship to Belinus Green in Chautauqua Co., as Elinor lived in or near that family after Samuel's death, and the children were reportedly raised together with this family--only proof of this is census records. She is also reported to spend several months with each of her children, once they were grown. The census records seem to support this gossip. {This Samuel Greene has been confused with a Samuel who was born in 1803 and died on 10-17-1846. He married Elinor Peleg and both are buried in Sterling, CT}
Samuel & Elinor Ferguson Greene's children included:
Clark who was born in 1833 & died at 19. He served as father to his younger siblings, but was thought to have been frail with some sort of respiratory problems. Lafe (Marcus Lafayette) who had the grape farm in Silver Creek. His family was unhappy with his second marriage. Harvey S. sold his interest in family farm to Lafe and moved his family to Michigan in abt 1865. By 1868 the family was back in Mansfield, NY on land next door to brother Heman (or Herman). Martha, who was born in 1843 went to live at an early age with Leyman & Sarah Newton. This couple was known to be related, but don't know how. Ruth born 1845 married Elijah Thomas. According to family letters they lived in Forestville, NY, and were frequent hosts of Elinor. The Thomases must have been fairly successful, as they reportedly assisted other family members. Daniel--have 2 conflicting pieces on him. One says that he died at age 7. The other says he was the father of Daniel who was a carpenter in Erie Co., NY.
Mary E was born after Samuel's death. She was reported spoiled by the rest of the family, and her death at age 8, was difficult.
Most of the online info on Harvey Stillman & Fidelia Balcom Greene is based on the 1870 census which had errors.
Have a page from Fidelia's Bible and it records the following children:
Unnamed infant born Aug 5 & died Aug 22 1863; Rev. Bert Stillman (my Ggrandfather) b. 22 Jun 1864 d 23 Nov 1929; Carrie L b 12 Apr 1866 d. 19 Sep 1912; Elmer Adele b 12 Feb 1869 d 29 Dec 1929; Clayton C b 20 Jun 1870 d 1952; Jessie May b 2 Apr 1872 d 1959. Have much info and some photos of this family.

As far as Heman/Herman info goes: his nephews referred to him as Uncle Herman, but most doc't shows him as Heman. His injuries and Harvey's asthma led to their partnership on a farm between Otto & Mansfield, NY. Both lost their interest in the family farm to Lafe.

Biggest questions:
Who were the parents of Samuel & Elinor. Most support that Samuel F. Green was Samuel Jr.'s father as they attended the same church and were buried next to each other at West Hill Cemetery in Mansfield. (By the way, family lore reports that Elinor had Samuel's remains moved to a cemetery in Chautauqua to be nearer to her family.) Early family researchers were adament that these two were not related, and no doc't shows that they were father and son. No birth records can be found, and as they were Free-will Baptist, no childhood baptism records. Have not been able to locate the church records from the Baptist church in Mansfield they both attended. The church disbanded abt 1848. Samuel Jr had a brother Heman who was also a member of the church. (I'm related to Lavina Sackett's, the one that many claim is Samuel's mom; family on my Ggrandmother's side of the family, and know that the link to this marriage is also fragil, and hasn't been proven either.)
Most people report that Elinor was born in Schoharie, NY. Family lore reports that she came from New Jersey.

Of course there is the usual Greene claim to ancestory with Gen. Nathaniel Greene, but ours was that Samuel was descended from an uncle of Nathaniel. No one could ever prove this.

How did Stillman's fit into this family. It is the middle name in at least 3 generations. Could it be Samuel or Elinor's mother?
Who was Elinor's brother, who is referred to in the Chautauqua area, but never mentioned by name?
How do Belinus, Stephen, & Charles fit into this family? Was Lafe's farm the one originally bought by Belinus?

Good luck with your research,
Brenda
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http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/NewAlbion1879Bios/NewAlbion1879Hist.htm
RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES;
About 1840 a Free-Will Baptist society was formed in the eastern part of the town, holding its meetings in the school-house, on lot 6. Among other members were Samuel and Heman GREEN, and George BABCOCK, the latter being a local preacher. Rev. Joseph DAVIS occasionally preached here. The loss of members by removal caused the society to disband in eight or ten years.
------
Name: Samuel Green
Residence: Cattaraugus, New York
Age in years: 46
Estimated birth year: 1804
Birth place: Vermont
Gender: Male
Race or color (on document):
Race or color (expanded):
Death month: Jul
Death date: Jul 1849
Film number: 1415128
Image number: 00114
Reference number: 6
Dwelling:
Household id:
Marital status: Married
Free or slave:
Collection: 1850 United States Census (Mortality Schedule)
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Find A Grave Memorial
Samuel Greene
Birth: 1803
Death: Jul. 24, 1849; Otto, Cattaraugus County, New York, USA

Family links:
Children:
Harvey Stillman Greene (1837 - 1871)

Burial:
West Hill Cemetery, Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus County, New York, USA

Created by: SBru
Record added: Jul 20, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 73665959 
Green, Samuel Jr. (I26185)
 
21 Marriage Announcement:
George Poorman Marries in West
Mrs. Mariana W. Kulas of Fort Collins, Colo., and George E. Poorman, of Hatboro, Pa. were married in St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Fort Collins. The announcement is made by her parents, Mr. and Mrs Walter G. Sackett, also of Fort Collins. Mr Poorman is the son of Mrs Alfred P. Poorman, of 329 Russell street, West Lafayette, and the late Prof. Poorman, of the Applied mechanics staff at Purdue University.
Rev. Edwin B. Thayer officiated and organ music was played by Mrs. Marvin Meiers. Both are of Fort Collins.
Mrs. David K. Clint Jr., of Denver, Colo., was matron of honor.
Flower girl was the bridegroom's niece, Betty Jensen, of Bedford, Ia. and Andrew Kulas, the bride's son, carried the ring. A. Elton Jensen Jr., of Bedford, Ia. was best man and the guests were ushered by John Hickman and William Amaden.
The reception was in the parish house.
Mr. and Mrs. Poorman will reside at Hatboro, Pa. The bride, who received her bachelor's degree from Colorado College and her master's degree from Mill's college, has been an assistant home economist at the Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical college Experimental station for six years. She is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, PEO, and the Rainbow Girls alumnae.
Mr. Poorman was graduated from Purdue University and is an engineer at the Naval Air Development Center at Johnsville, Pa. His college fraternity was Phi Kappa Tau.
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Four children. Two sons and two children sex unknown.
------
Birth and Death place was: Wabash Valley Sanitarium, West Lafayette,
Tippecanoe, IN. (Paul Poorman's research).

Obituary in Hatboro Today's Spirit Newspaper, November 1996.
George Poorman, 83, of Warminster, a 42-year resident of Hatboro, died Nov. 22 in the Richboro Nursing Center. He was the husband of Mariana W. (Sackett) Poorman. Born in West Lafayette, Ind., he was the son of the late Alfred P. and Sarah E. (Ellmaker) Poorman. Mr Poorman was a graduate of Purdue University.
Prior to his retirement in 1986, he was employed as an aeronautical engineer at the former Johnsville Naval Air Station. He was also on the Bureau of Aeronautics in Washington, D.C., an active member of the Philadelphia American Youth Hostel Organization and the Lehman United Methodist Church, where he sang in the choir. He also had been a member of F.G.B.M.F.I. In addition to his wife, he is survived by four sons, James of Roslyn, Paul of Meridian, Idaho, Peter of Seattle, Wash., and John of Quakertown.; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday at the Lehman Memorial Methodist Church, S. York Road, Hatboro, Pa. 19040. Memorials in his name may be made to the Organ Fund of the above named church. Arrangements were by the James R. Baskwill Funeral Home, Inc. Hatboro.
George was a very meticulous man and had many hobbies, including bicycles, gem polishing, archery, hiking, model railroading, travel, gardening, Volkswagen buses, trains, opera, old clocks, and singing. He met Mariana Sackett while riding on the train to Colorado sometime before 1937. 
Poorman, George Ellmaker (I27637)
 
22 Mr. Todd lived the first twenty-one years of his ife in Charlemont, Mass., assisting his father with the work on the farm. Attaining his majority, he started for the west. Arriving in Michigan, he found employment in the saw mills of Lenawa County for several years. Returning to Massachusetts, he purchased a piece of timber land and began manufacturing "shook," or dress staves which were shipped to the West Indies, to be used for barreling sugar. In 1854, he, with his brother, Dexter, journeyed to Minnesota, and was employed for a time in building and operating a large saw mill at St. Anthony, which was the first mill to be biult on Rum River. In those days, wooden pins were used to hold the frame of buildings together. Each man on the job was requested to make a pin. As Mr. Todd's was the best specimen offered, he was given the task of making enough for the mill then in process f construction.
In the spring of 1855, Mr. Todd returned to Minnesota, this time making the journey on horseback. Passing through Rochester, where the settlers were just beginning to build, he arrived the next day on the fank of Zumbro River. There being no bridge, he and his horse were obliged to swim across. This being accomplished, he proceeded to spread his money and papers on the grass to dry. Journeying on he soon after came to Elba, Winona County, Minn., which seemed to be situated in a well watered and wooded valley, and looked something like home to him, his old home in the east. Near here he took up his claim of 160 acres in sections 6 and 7, where he made his home until the time of his death, where his fmily lived for forty years.
In 1858, he built a saw mill, which for many years, prepared the lumber for the houses of his neighbors. Improvements were made on the farm from time to time, and by various purchases, that area was increased to 350 acres in the home farm and 40 accres more in another lot, it being wel stocked and free of debt.
In politics, Mr. Todd was a Democrat, which did not, however, prevent him from supporting the Federal Government during the civil war. One time he advanced a thousand dollars to the town for bounties to volunteers, which was subsequently returned to him. He was chairman of the board of Supervisors during the war, and again in 1871. He wa active in the support of the schools and held various school offices. - [Todd Genealogy, pgs 306-7]
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Find A Grave Memorial
Addison Eli Todd
Birth: «tab»Jul. 22, 1821
Zoar, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
Death: unknown; [stone broken through death date]
Elba, Winona County, Minnesota, USA
Burial:
Fairwater Cemetery, Elba, Winona County, Minnesota, USA

Family links:
Parents:
Eli Todd (1795 - 1885)
Mary Russell Legate Todd (1796 - 1873)

Created by: Tarry Samsel
Record added: Mar 15, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 25287291
Headstone picture added by: Terry Samsel 
Todd, Addison E. (I34889)
 
23 ". . . was married to Ella Rathburn, from whom he secured a divorce . . ."
The Sacketts of America, by Weygant, p. 222 
Family F519
 
24 (Her 1st of 2) Family F12500
 
25 (Her 1st of 3) Family F12496
 
26 (Her 1st of 3=Div 1958) Family F12505
 
27 (Her 3rd of 3=Div 1940) Family F12498
 
28 (His 1st of 3 Div 1935 no Kids) Family F12503
 
29 (His 3rd/Her 2nd) Family F12482
 
30 1930 Scotch Grove, Jones, Iowa Census As Gustav F. Vonsprecken.
WWI draft record has name as Gustav Frederick Vonsprecken.
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California Death Index, 1940-1997
Description: Name: VONSPRECKEN, GUSTAV F
Social Security #: 712127147
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 8 Jan 1893
Birthplace: IOWA
Death Date: 8 Feb 1972
Death Place: LOS ANGELES 
Vonsprecken, Gustav F. (I15711)
 
31 300 Mulberry Street

An old friend was responsible for Ely Parker's final career as a desk clerk. General William F. Smith was a Civil War veteran, and had supervised Ely's engineering work at Detroit and in Chattanooga. By 1876, Smith was president of the New York City Police Department's Board of Commissioners, and he used his influence to get Parker a job. The pay was a modest $2,400 a year, but it was work, and on September 30, 1876, the former Commissioner of Indian Affairs walked to his office at 300 Mulberry Street and reported for duty.

"He was hired as a clerk. A clerk to the supply and repair committee. A job that kept food on the table, but no real responsibilities, little satisfaction. Parker served in that job the last 19 years of his life, working on requisitions for brooms and shovels and pens and erasers. Quite a come down."

William Armstrong
Parker Biographer
New York Harbor
New York Harbor

The Parkers moved to New York and, according to William Armstrong, Ely became a familiar sight on the city's streets, "usually dressed in a suit of slate-colored cloth, a Prince Albert coat, and a sugar-loaf hat with a stiff, flat brim." Inside 300 Mulberry Street, Ely was a mostly silent observer - as politics raged and commissioners and clerks were cleaned out, he stayed at his desk contending with what he called an "overwhelming" amount of work. But he also made new friends; one of them was Jacob Riis, who worked as a police reporter for the New York Tribune and Evening Sun. Riis also authored The Making of an American, which contained a tribute of sorts to his Seneca friend:

"I suppose it was the fact that he was an Indian that first attracted me to him. As the years passed we became great friends, and I loved nothing better in an idle hour than to smoke a pipe with the General in his pokey little office at Police Headquarters. That was about all there was to it too, for he rarely opened his mouth except to grunt approval of something I was saying. When, once in a while, it would happen that some of his people came down from the Reservation or from Canada, the powwow that ensued was my dear delight. Three pipes and about eleven grunts made up the whole of it, but it was none the less entirely friendly and satisfactory. We all have our own ways of doing things, and that was theirs. He was a noble old fellow. His title was no trumpery show, either. It was fairly earned on more than one bloody field with Grant's army. Parker was Grant's military secretary, and wrote the original draft of the surrender at Appomattox, which he kept to his death with great pride. It was not General Parker, however, but Donehogawa, Chief of the Senecas and of the remnant of the once powerful Six Nations, and guardian of the western door of the council lodge, that appealed to me, who in my boyhood had lived with Leatherstocking and with Uncas and Chingachgook. They had something to do with my coming here, and at last I had for a friend one of their kin. I think he felt the bond of sympathy between us and prized it, for he showed me in many silent ways that he was fond of me. There was about him an infinite pathos, penned up there in his old age among the tenements of Mulberry Street on the pay of a second-rate clerk, that never ceased to appeal to me."

Jacob A. Riis
Making of an American

Ely Parker also found companionship with fellow war veterans. He joined the Grand Army of the Republic, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the Society for Colonial Wars. He rekindled his skills as a powerful orator, and in 1889 traveled as far as Chicago to speak to a Masonic gathering. He carried with him the silver Red Jacket medal that he proudly displayed and explained to hundreds in the audience. The medal seemed to be his most cherished memento, and as evidenced by the following newspaper article, Parker was vigilant about its authenticity.

Geneva Gazette, March 18, 1891 Preface by the Editor:
The following letter is so self-explanatory that nothing more need be said about the matter contained in it, the writer merely adding that another, said to be, Red Jacket medal, is in the hands of the indefatigable investigator, George H. Harris, Rochester, NY, similar in size an appearance to the Canandaigua medal, but dated 1795, and having 15 stars, the number of States at that time.

This letter is remarkable for its elegant diction and beauty and plainness of writing. The writer, General Ely S. Parker, is a prominent Civil Engineer in New York City, is the leading Seneca Sachem, was "raised up" to the Sachemship in 1851 with the title of "Door Keeper" (Donehogawa) and was an officer in the civil war on the staff of General Grant, and drew up the articles of capitulation at the time of the surrender of General Lee.

New York, March 9th, 1891

To:Geo. S. Conover, Esq., Geneva, NY

Dear Sir:

Permit me to thank you sincerely and heartily for your able circular and letter, dated February 1891, on the Washington Red Jacket Medal.

It seems that your article was written in consequence of a medal purporting to have belonged to the famous Indian orator, having been presented to the "Red Jacket Club" at Canandaigua by Mrs. Thomas Francis Meagher, a grand-daughter of Capt. Jasper Parrish of Canandaigua, whilom interpreter for the Seneca Indians.

I saw this medal during its exhibition a short time ago at Tiffany & Co.'s' jewelry store on Union Square in this city. It was labeled "The Red Jacket Medal". I took pains to assure Tiffany's people that it was not a Red Jacket Medal, nor the one he wore throughout his life, and at the same time showed them the genuine medal which is in my possession. I also took an early opportunity of writing to the Hon. Thos. Howell of Canandaigua about it, and gave it as my firm conviction that Red Jacket never wore, or owned, this medal. It is however a genuine Washington Indian medal, shaped and inscribed on both sides like mine, with same date, viz.: 1792. Its longest diameter is about 5 inches, mine is 7 inches. I suggested to Mr. Howell that it would be well to advise the Club of the preceding facts. Whether he has done so or no, I am unable to say.

Perhaps it would be well for history if this medal question should now be definitely settled. But how can it be done? It is almost a century since these medals were given, and I believe nearly all of the present possessors of the Washington Indian medals have begun to trace their ownership back to Red Jacket. Besides mine and this one at Canandaigua, I hear of one being in some collection at Albany, another in the collection of the Pennsylvania Historical Society at Philadelphia, and another still in Texas.

At Red Jacket's death, and in accordance with Indian custom, my medal was given by his relations, in the distribution of his personal effects, to one James Johnson, a favorite nephew of his, and at that time a young and promising chief. Johnson retained it about 20 years, and at my installation as a leading Sachem of the Iroquois Confederacy in 1851, I was formally invested with it by the master of ceremonies placing it about my neck, the speaker remarking that it was given by the great Washington to my tribal relative Red Jacket, and that it was to be retained and worn as evidence of the bond of perpetual peace and friendship established and entered into between the people of the United States and the Six Nations of Indians at the time of its presentation. There were scores of chiefs and other Indians present at this ceremony who personally had known Red Jacket and were familiar with the medal, and it is not probable or supposable that they all would have been deceived as to its genuineness, or countenanced an imposition by having a bogus medal placed abut my neck on so important an occasion.

I have since met many old settlers of Buffalo and vicinity, among whom I will only mention Hon. O. H. Marshall, Orlando Allen, H.N. Porter, John Ganson, Benj. Dole, Mr. Sibley, Mr. Turner (author of the "Holland Land Purchase") who have asked me to show them the medal, and they have instantly and invariably recognized it as the one they had so often seen worn by Red Jacket, and also the bead string by which it is suspended.

The Washington medals are all inscribed alike upon both sides, varying only in size and date. Mine is a large one and dated 1792 - has 13 stars, the eagle holding 13 arrows in one claw and an olive branch in the other.

Respectfully yours, & c., Ely S. Parker Or Do-ne-ho-ga-wa, Iroquois Sachem

Although Parker still signed his letters as an "Iroquois Sachem," he hadn't fulfilled the responsibilities of that title for over three decades. When he did journey to western New York, it was for a vacation. Once or twice a year he would visit his brother Nic at the Cattaraugus reservation - there he was greeted as an elder statesman. A portrait of him in full military dress was prominently featured in Nic's sitting room, and over it hung one of Ely's military swords. The sword captured the imagination of Nic's grandson, Arthur Parker, who wondered if he could ever be "as great as Uncle Ely, and wear a sword like that." When Ely came to visit, Arthur Parker said, "He would bring a suit of clothes for my grandfather, made in the exact pattern of his own; and a big satchel of presents for everyone else. I must have been seven years old when I first saw Uncle Ely. I did not know he had come, and rushing into the sitting room, I called out "Gramp!" Then I fell back in dismay, for there were two "Gramps," dressed alike and to my startled eyes, each an exact counterpart, but when they spoke I noticed that their voices were slightly different."

Ely and Nicholson Parker did look strikingly alike, and shared the closest bond among the Parker siblings. Another brother, Levi Parker, and his sister Carrie, died in 1891; Nicholson passed in 1892, and Ely was "left alone," said Arthur Parker, the last of the "grandfather generation."

Arthur Parker's comments quoted from,
The Life of General Ely S.Parker,
Arthur C. Parker, Buffalo Historical Society, 1919.  
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
32 48, M, 29, 7-4, New York, New York, New York, ---
Camp Family Database: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genlady
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1870 Census; Plattsburg, Clinton County, New York
Page No. 44; 21 July, 1870; Post Office: West Plattsburgh, New York
1045/1230
Cline, Jennett, 17, F, W, ---, N. York
------
1880 Census; Schuyler Falls, Clinton, New York
Family History Library Film: 1254820
NA Film Number: T9-0820
Page Number: 556D
Janet EMERY, Wife, M, Female, W, 27, NY, Keeping House, NY, NY
------
Name: Genette Emery
Birthdate: 1851
Age in years: 41
Birthplace: United States
Gender: Female
Residence: Plattsburgh, E.D. 06, Clinton, New York
Citizen or Alien: Citizen
Film number: 0863412
Digital GS number: 4369969
Image number: 283
Collection: New York State Census, 1892
------
1900 Census; Plattsburgh town, Clinton County, New York
SD No. 5; ED No. 24; Sheet No. 3A; 4 June, 1900
48/51
Emery, William W., Head, W, M, May 1851, 49, M, 29, New York, New York, New York, Laborer Pulpmill
Emery, Jenett, Wife, W, F, Oct. 1851, 
Cline, Jenette (I25335)
 
33 9 Maria; m. ___ Atwater of Canandaigua, N.Y. - [Jacobus, p1768-9]
------
http://ontario.nygenweb.net/pioneercemcitycdga.htm
Pioneer Cemetery City of Canandaigua - Ontario County NY
Atwater, Maria, wife of Jeremiah; born New Haven, Conn. Nov 15 1783; died Mar 21 1862
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Find A Grave Memorial
Maria Atwater
Birth: Oct. 15, 1783
Death: Mar. 21, 1862

Family links:
Spouse:
Jeremiah Atwater (1771 - 1861)

Burial:
Pioneer Cemetery, Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York, USA

Created by: Butterfly~Kisses
Record added: Apr 16, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 68454583 
Thompson, Maria (I34151)
 
34 Buried in: Oak Grove Cemetery, Springfield, MA.
Location in Cemetery: Sec. 12, Lot # 752 Fushia Path 
___, Alice H. (I30907)
 
35 Commissioner Parker on Trial

In 1869, a New York Times article announced the formal induction of Ely S. Parker to his post as Commissioner of Indian Affairs: "The clerks and Attaches of the Bureau were then presented and received by General Parker. He informed them that no immediate changes would be made because there were several more important matters which demanded his early attention, but at no distant day he would devote himself to reorganization of the Bureau, when the revision of the clerical force might be expected."

"Ely Parker would try (he failed, but he would try) to reorganize one of the more corrupt administrations in all the history of our corrupt governments. The Indian Ring was profoundly corrupt; the agents of the government in passing out treaty goods and allowances to Native peoples, everywhere, but especially in the west, gave corruption a whole new and dreadful dimension. He inherited this, tried to change this."

Stephen Saunders Webb, Ph.D.
Maxwell School, Syracuse University

Prior to Grant's administration, the agents and superintendents of the Indian Affairs office were political appointees; competition for the modestly-paid positions fed beliefs of widespread graft and theft from Indian nations. The Peace Policy terminated the political system; the positions were instead proffered to members of the Quaker religion and Army officers, men who Parker and Grant felt could create an honest administration. Then a Board of Indian Commissioners was appointed to oversee the agencies, identify and eliminate dishonest practices, and generally advise the government on its Indian policies.

"The first Chairman of that board was a man named William Welsh, a prominent Episcopal layman. Welsh thought that the board should have more power than it did, and when Ely Parker demonstrated that the ultimate power really resided in the Commissioner's office, Welsh resigned."

William Armstrong
Parker Biographer

But Welsh remained active behind the scenes, and would engineer Commissioner Parker's undoing. William Armstrong called Welsh a "very peculiar person, very suspicious person, saw corruption everywhere and became convinced that Parker was part of the so-called Indian Ring." Perhaps still bearing a grudge against Parker, Welsh once told an acquaintance that the Commissioner was "the representative of a race only one generation from barbarism, and did not think that he should be expected to be able to withstand the inducements of parties who were his superiors in matters of business."

By December 1870, Welsh's investigation of Ely Parker went public. In a letter published in Washington newspapers, Welsh accused Parker of malfeasance in office. Welsh had investigated a June 1870 delivery of beef and flour to Indians on the Missouri River, and had concluded that the supplies weren't needed, and weren't approved by the Board of Indian Commissioners. He accused Parker of deliberately paying too much for the beef, so that he could share in illegal profits estimated at $250,000.

Welsh filed 13 counts of misconduct against Parker with the House of Representatives, charges which Ely denied in a letter of rebuttal that concluded with: "Your committee will observe, upon reading the charges numbered from one to thirteen inclusive, that in some cases they contain statements of facts of which I have no knowledge; that they abound in inferences of the person making them which do not necessarily follow from the facts themselves; that they cover a wide range of inquiry, not only into particular transactions, but the general policy of the Indian Office; that they are often vague and uncertain in allegations of the facts, but of this I care little. There are substantial averments which concern me personally and officially, and all such I stand ready to answer."

However, when hearings before the House Committee on Appropriations began, Parker took to his bed, physically incapacitated by the scandalous nature of the charges. His defense was run by his good friend and attorney Norton Chipman, who had established his reputation as the trial prosecutor of the Confederate prison camp at Andersonville. Chipman's defense of Parker was passionate and comprehensive; his arguments and presentation of evidence refuted nearly all the charges. Chipman also launched a scathing attack on William Welsh and the almost pathological lengths he went to in his investigation of Ely Parker: "Certainly whatever knowledge that persistent, patient and searching inquiry could produce, will be found here. The prosecutor, Mr. Welsh, has been denied no facility in any quarter, official or otherwise, which would lead to the discovery of any important fact connected with the charges. He has had access to the files and records of all the departments and bureaus of the government, and has used this privilege freely. He has even caused to be brought before the committee the private bank account of at least one person with whom he suspected General Parker may have been in collusion. And I do not doubt that the same zeal which led him to the examination of this bank account, has also led him to make the same fruitless search with regard to the private bank account of General Parker elsewhere."

Eventually, Ely Parker was compelled from his sick bed to testify before the committee. He also filed the following communication with the committee's chairman.

"Mr. Chairman: In asking you to consider the suggestions submitted by my friend and counsel in this investigation, General Chipman, it is proper, perhaps, that I should say a word myself. I will not attempt to go over the testimony, as that has been done by my friend, nor could I do so with any satisfaction myself, or in any way to aid your committee, for I have not been able to attend the investigation, during its progress, and am not familiar enough with the facts of record to assist you in your examination of it. I do not know either, that I can now add anything to what I have said under oath in reply to questions asked me by the committee, and which I suppose were intended to cover the whole ground of this investigation.

When I entered upon the discharge of the duties of my office, I knew how sensitive the public were with regard to the administration of our Indian affairs. I knew, too, the solicitude with which Congress has always regarded that bureau of our Government service, and firmly resolved that I would administer the office to the best of my ability, and in such a manner that no taint of dishonor, at least, should ever attach to my conduct.

To what extent my ability has proved equal to the duties devolved upon me, it is not becoming for me to speak. I know that I have spared no pains, no sacrifice of personal convenience and pleasure, to discharge my whole duty faithfully. I do not claim that I have made no mistakes, for that is more, but, Mr. Chairman, I do say, and I speak it in a solemn a manner as I am capable, and to this extent I have already sworn, that I have never profited pecuniarily, or indeed otherwise by any transaction in my official capacity while I have been serving as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

I cannot know in advance how you will regard the various matters which have been made the subject of your investigation, as they affect my personal honor and official integrity; but whether they are sufficiently explained by the facts in the record or not, no view which you may take of them can change the knowledge within my own breast, that I have never sought to defraud the Government of one penny, or have knowingly lent my aid to others with that view. There is not to be found anywhere in connection with this trial - if I make speak of it as a trial - a single transaction about which I had at the time, or until Mr. Welsh published his letter of December last, the slightest suspicion that my conduct would be inquired into. All of my official acts now before your committee, were performed in the usual routine of my official duties. I gave them no further thought afterwards than such as would naturally come up in the mind of a public officer in the casual review of his past administration.

When I was, in January, suddenly called upon to explain transactions of my office, six months previous, I could only rely for explanation upon such records as happened to remain in my office, and upon such facts as I could from other sources, bring to the attention of the committee. As to the effect of these records and facts, you are to be the judges, and I leave them with you in the full belief that you will weigh them well before you condemn my action.

If human testimony is to be believed, and if my sworn statements of other with whom I am suspected of being in complicity are to be credited, I think I may safely leave the question of my personal honor in your hands. As to the wisdom of any particular act of mine into which you have been examining, of course your judgement and mine may differ, and as to this I can only rest upon the circumstances surrounding me at the time, and the facts in the record, tending to show whether I acted wisely or not.

You must admit, Mr. Chairman, that the matter is one of great moment to me, and while I have no right to ask at your hands any report other than that which may be the result of your own convictions, I think I have the right to ask that at the time you make it to the House of Representatives, you will also state all the material facts upon which your conclusions should rest. I do not shrink from any responsibility which I have incurred, or its just consequences, and I only ask that that body which ultimately determines upon the result of the investigation, shall have that full knowledge of my conduct which will enable them to form a correct judgement in a matter of such great importance to me."

E.S. Parker

The committee issued its findings in the winter of 1871: "To the committee, the testimony shows irregularities, neglect and incompetency, and, in some instances, a departure from the express provisions of law for the regulation of Indian expenditures, and in the management of affairs in the Indian Department. But your committee have not found evidence of fraud or corruption on the part of the Indian Commissioner. With much to criticize and condemn, arising partly from errors of judgement in the construction of statutes passed to insure economy and faithfulness in administration, we have no evidence of any pecuniary or personal advantage sought or derived by the Commissioner, or anyone connected with his Bureau."

"But at the same time, Congress turned around and passed a law that gave the board of Indian commissioners more power than it had before. That they were to have joint supervision with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs over every expenditure of the office. And that act, taking away Parker's own responsibility, and the hurt of those charges, led Parker to give it all up. He had been in office only two years and fairly successful two years. Helped establish this Peace Policy of Grant's, and to some extent, calmed things down in the west. But Parker could not in good conscience continue in that position, and resigned."

William Armstrong
Parker Biographer

Parker said he could not in justice, "continue to hold the ambiguous position I now occupy as Commissioner of Indian Affairs," and resigned effective August 1, 1871. President Grant did not try to talk him out of it, instead offering Parker a letter of agreement. Their 11-year friendship was all but over when Ely left Washington.

"There were a few meetings?.Parker had transcribed the terms of surrender at Appomattox, and he had kept one of the flimsy manifold copies that Grant had drafted the terms. And I think in the 1870s he looked Grant up, and asked Grant to endorse that it was, in fact, authentic, which Grant did. On another occasion, Grant had been on a world tour and the staff went to see Grant when he came back. And then finally when Grant was dying of cancer, Parker tried to see him. Saw his son; was not able to see Grant. I don't know if he was being rebuffed. It might have been that Grant simply was physically not able to see him.

"I don't know why the rift between the two men. Their closeness certainly evaporated after Washington. Parker at one point blamed Mrs. Grant; now this was not in public, this was in private conversations; he blamed her for her love of wealth and its effect on her husband. Publicly, he always expressed loyalty to Grant, he wouldn't get into controversies; but privately I think he felt that Grant had gradually abandoned his old staff."

William Armstrong
Parker Biographer

"I think the explanation is a military one. Grant's original staff was professional people and old friends from Galena: essentially civilians and members of the U.S. volunteers. When Grant becomes the General of the Armies of the Potomac, he brings in a professional staff of West Pointers. And ever afterwards, Parker says, Grant wanted to please the professionals who had previously looked down on him as a bad performer at the academy, and a drunk, and an incompetent officer. As Parker says, "It was West Pointers who ruined us all." His own appointment as military secretary was seen as an enormous victory of the old staff over the new, for the volunteers staff over the professionals. Parker tells us that got even worse in the Grant Presidency. That Grant's desire to please the professional soldiers, the West Pointers, led him to denigrate those who were not of that tradition.

Secondly he says Grant himself had no talent for politics, and at the same time had enormous need for, and love of, money -- "filthy lucre", Parker called it. And that those two things combined to bring him down. Grant was politically adept at covering his tracks, and he was corrupt. And hence, his own fear of political scandal, and his own personal corruption, tends to separate him from people like Parker, at least during the Presidency."

Stephen Saunders Webb, Ph.D.
Maxwell School, Syracuse University  
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
36 Elizabeth Parker's "Dream of Prophecy"

The debate continues concerning Elizabeth Parker's dream. Some historians and Haudenosaunee believe it is mythological, rather than proven fact. The only published source for the account is found in Arthur C. Parker's biography of his great-uncle, The Life of General Ely S. Parker. In that book, Arthur Parker claims that Harriet Maxwell Converse and New York Herald reporter John Habbard each heard the story from 19th century Tonawanda Senecas. Their account is transcribed in quotations below.

According to these sources, in 1828 Ely's mother (a Tonawanda Seneca woman named Elizabeth Parker) was five months into pregnancy. One night she dreamed that she was in the Buffalo Creek Reservation, near the farm of a local man named Granger. As she looked up through snowflakes swirling from heavy skies, she saw a rainbow suddenly break through. As it arched, it broke in two, and on one side Elizabeth saw suspended signs with lettering similar to those she had seen over white men's stores.

Elizabeth took her vision to a Dreamguesser who told her:

"A son will be born to you who will be distinguished among his nation as a peace-maker. He will become a white man as well as an Indian. He will be a wise white man, but will never desert his people, nor, 'lay down his horns' (Sachem's title) as a great chief. His name will reach from the east to the west, the north to the south, as great among his Indian family and pale-faces. His sun will rise on Indian land and set on white man's land. Yet the ancient land of his people will fold him in death."  
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
37 Ely Parker Biography

4/4/00 A Time of Crisis
Ely Parker was born in 1828, during a jouncing, 30-mile buckboard ride as his parents sped home to their Tonawanda Reservation in western New York. Elizabeth and William Parker called their new son Ha-sa-no-an-da, translated from Seneca to "Leading Name" and they would raise him within in the traditions of the once-dominant League of the Haudenosaunee (also known as Six Nations or Iroquois). But the 18th and 19th centuries brought rapid change that would define Ha-sa-no-an-da's early years. As white settlements pressed in on Tonawanda, Elizabeth Parker sent her son to a Baptist Mission school where he could get a mainstream education. There, Ha-sa-no-an-da gained a new identity; he adopted the first name of the school's minister and began calling himself Ely Parker.

Ely's "white world" education became paramount when crisis struck Tonawanda: the 1838 and subsequent 1842 Treaties of Buffalo Creek threatened to remove the Senecas to Kansas. As elders planned state and federal appeals, a series of fateful events would place Ely in a leadership role. The first was a brush with English soldiers who mocked Ely's broken attempts at English. The proud young Seneca vowed never to be mocked again, and in 1842 began attending Yates Academy where he mastered the English language in all its forms. Seneca elders had been watching the 14-year-old's progress, and appointed him as their translator, scribe, and interpreter for crucial correspondence and meetings with government leaders.

The Open Door
Lewis Henry Morgan wanted to "sound the war whoop," when he spotted Ely Parker in 1844, and that chance meeting would lead to a six year partnership, one of the more influential in Parker's life. His documentation of Haudenosaunee culture was critical to Morgan's anthropological studies. In return, Morgan supported the Seneca's assimilation, arranging his admittance into the elite, white, Cayuga Academy. Ely's reception was hostile, but schoolmate challenges only served to build his self-confidence. He was ready for a new test -- in the arena of national politics.

In 1846, Parker went to Washington, D.C. as the Senecas' "voice" in their fight for the Tonawanda reservation. For a year he lobbied at the White House and Capitol, but his efforts ended in a stunning defeat. Despite promises of support, a Senate Committee voted against the Tonawanda petition.

As the Senecas took their campaign to the courts, Parker pursued his personal ambitions. For a time he studied law, but he was derailed by racist New York State policies. Then in 1850, Lewis Henry Morgan found him a position as a civil engineer. That job brought Ely Parker to Rochester, New York, for the expansion of the Erie Canal. His experiences there pulled him further into the white mainstream, and Rochester became the setting for major achievements in his life. In 1851, Parker was promoted in engineering, celebrated the publication of League of the Ho-de-no-sau-nee or Iroquois, and was installed as a Sachem of the Six Nations Confederacy. Six years later, Do-ne-ho-ga-wa (Parker's new given name, translated as "Open Door") established his greatest legacy when he led treaty negotiations that allowed the Tonawanda Senecas to buy back about two-thirds of their reservation land.

The next decade marked another turning point for Ely Parker. In 1857 he moved to Galena, Illinois, to supervise construction of a federal customshouse. He was 29 years old, a man in his prime, who would establish a national reputation for his engineering skills. While in Galena, he happened to meet Ulysses S. Grant, who in 1860 was an ex-Army officer languishing as a clerk in his father's store. The bond they forged changed Parker's life. In 1863 he joined the "great captain" in the Civil War, rising to the post of Military Secretary. In the waning hours of that war, Parker left his indelible mark on American history during the surrender at Appomattox.

 
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
38 Ely Parker was born in 1828, during a jouncing, 30-mile buckboard ride as his parents sped home to their Tonawanda Reservation in western New York. Elizabeth and William Parker called their new son Ha-sa-no-an-da, translated from Seneca to "Leading Name," and they would raise him within the traditions of the once-dominant League of the Haudenosaunee (also known as Haudenosawnee or Iroquois). But the 18th and 19th centuries brought rapid change that would define Ha-sa-no-an-da's early years. As white settlements pressed in on Tonawanda, Elizabeth Parker sent her son to a Baptist Mission school where he could get a mainstream education. There, Ha-sa-no-an-da gained a new identity; he adopted the first name of the school's minister and began calling himself Ely Parker.

Ely's "white world" education became paramount when crisis struck Tonawanda: the 1838 and subsequent 1842 Treaties of Buffalo Creek threatened to remove the Senecas to Kansas. As elders planned state and federal appeals, a series of fateful events would place Ely in a leadership role. The first was a brush with English soldiers who mocked Ely's broken attempts at English. The proud young Seneca vowed never to be mocked again, and in 1842 began attending Yates Academy where he mastered the English language in all its forms. Seneca elders had been watching the 14-year-old's progress, and appointed him as their translator, scribe, and interpreter for crucial correspondence and meetings with government leaders.

 
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
39 Fanny L. d 9/28/1869 in her 70th year probably LOOMIS
in 1850 Orvis and Fanny are in Westfield with
Elizabeth HOTCHKISS 21 and probably Fanny's father Joel LOOMIS 74
------
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14765669
Fanny Loomis Nichols
Birth: 1799;
Death: Sep. 28, 1869
Burial: Lot K 83, East Ripley Cemetery, Ripley, Chautauqua County, New York, USA

born about 1799, age 70 at death;
daughter of Joel Loomis and Susannah Baird; wife of Orvis Nichols

Family links:
Parents:
Joel Loomis (1776 - 1851)
Susannah Baird Loomis (1780 - 1849)

Created by: Ted
Record added: Jun 28, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14765669
By: Ted Kenniston 
Loomis, Fanny (I30767)
 
40 http://www.rootsweb.com/~inrandol/
Thomas H. Clark, substantial farmer, public servant and man of affairs, was born August 26, 1846, on a farm in Warren county, Ohio, and he is a son of Thomas and Susannah (Cox) Clark, and was one of nine children, he being the only son, and was fourth in order of birth. His sisters are, Ann Eliza, married B. V. M. Brouse, a farmer of Ward township, and died at the age of fifty-one years, leaving seven children: Mary Jane is the widow of William Valentine, who was a farmer near Springfield, Ohio, and she has seven children; Emmeline married Cyrus Sackett, now deceased; she lives near Winchester and has five children, two having died in early life; Sarah Elizabeth is the widow of Thomas Seagraves, who was a farmer, and she had five children; Arabella, deceased, married Henry Hobbick, a farmer in Kansas, and three sons were born to them; Martha, of Muncie, Indiana, is the widow of Colvin Mann, who was a farmer, and five children were born to them; Margaret, widow of Robert Reynolds, lives at Winchester, by whom she had four children; she later married Daniel Keys and to them four children were born: Hannah, deceased, was the wife of Robert McCracken, also deceased he was a farmer and merchant of Green township, and to them three children were born.
Thomas Clark, father of our subject, was reared on a farm in Warren county, Ohio. About 1840 he came to Indiana and took up a homestead, then returned to Ohio, where he remained seven years, then came back to Indiana and established his future home, and here his death occurred in 1888 at the age of seventy-one years. His farm has remained in the family, our subject now occupying the same. He was a successful farmer and a good and useful man. ... The father of our subject had a premonition of his death six months before the final summons came, and made his arrangements accordingly. ... 
Clark, Thomas (I29130)
 
41 In 1860, aged about 5, she resided in Fallsburg, Sullivan, New York. In 1870, aged about 15, she resided in Philo, Champaign, Illinois. In 1900, aged about 45, she resided in Wichita Ward 5, Sedgwick, Kansas. SARAH died on 12 5 1906, aged 50, in Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA. [Kent Mauk]
------
MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY, Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas
Section A Lot Singl Grave 145 
Noteware, Sarah Louise (I64179)
 
42 In 1910 as an infant, he resided in Lincoln, Garfield, Oklahoma. Feger, Harlold Wayne (I64145)
 
43 iv Sheldon; res. Ppt; m Anna Stark of D. - 9Jacobus, p2018] Wooding, Sheldon (I33107)
 
44 John was born on September 15, 1836 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania and is the son of Benjamin Campbell and Margaretha (Wilson) Campbell. Until the age of twenty-five, John Campbell taught school. John enlisted in the Union Army, Company K, 61st Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served until October, 1862 when he was honorably discharged due to loss of one eye and typhoid fever. After returning from the war, John became a school teacher and Desdamona was one of his pupils. John was twenty-seven and Desdamona was seventeen and family tradition tells us that the family was opposed to the match and has been said that she was disowned from the family. However, Desdamona was later a recipient of property in her father’s will.

John and Desdamona Campbell lived in Genoa, Illinois and later moved to Grenola, Kansas. In 1880, John and Desdamona Campbell were living in Cowley County, Kansas. In 1896, they moved to Delta, Colorado. In 1900, John and Desdamona Campbell were living in Delta County, Colorado. Much later, they moved to Glendale, Arizona and then to Ontario, California. Desdamona (Williams) Campbell died on May 8, 1924 in Upland, California. John Campbell died on January 3, 1931 in Ontario, California and was buried in the Bellevue Cemetery.
Children:
Frederick Arthur Campbell, b. January 18, 1864, Genoa, Illinois
Benjamin Franklin Campbell, b. July 27, 1867, Genoa, Illinois
Mabel Emma Campbell, b. May 22, 1869, Genoa, Illinois
Charles William Campbell, b. January 28, 1871, Genoa, Illinois
Edith Luella Campbell, b. October 14, 1872, Genoa, Illinois
Daisy Margurite Bexa Campbell, b. August 26, 1874, Grenola, Kansas
Edward Everett Campbell, b. June 21, 1876, Grenola, Kansas
------
1880 Census, Windsor, Cowley, Kansas
FHL Film: 1254378; NA Film No.: T9-0378
Page No.: 632B
J. E. CAMPBELL, Self, M, Male, W, 43, PA, Farmer, ---, ---
Desdemona M. CAMPBELL, Wife, M, Female, W, 34, IL, Keeping House, KY, IN
Fredie A. CAMPBELL, Son, S, Male, W, 16, IL, --, PA, IL
Benjman F. CAMPBELL, Son, S, Male, W, 13, IL, --, PA, IL
Mable E. CAMPBELL, Dau, S, Female, W, 11, IL, --, PA, IL
Charles W. CAMPBELL, Son, S, Male, W, 9, IL, --, PA, IL
Edith L. CAMPBELL, Dau, S, Female, W, 8, KS, --, PA, IL
Dasy M. B. CAMPBELL, Dau, S, Female, W, 6, KS, --, PA, IL
Edward E. CAMPBELL, Son, S, Male, W, 2, KS, --, PA, IL 
Campbell, John E. (I27233)
 
45 Olive *HUNGERFORD, died Jan. 18, 1812, in the 48th year of her age, and her
grave is beside husband. She was the daughter of Daniel Hungerford and
SISTER of Daniel Hungerford II who was also here d 1839 and Their sons
were Samuel, William, Robert C., Fayette and Andrew and their daughters were
Jane, who married Joseph Cass, and Olive DICKSON who married Judd W. CASS.
Samuel and Fayette died in Westfield, Robert C in Ohio Andrew in Ripley
SON William was the father of Albert, Campbell and Dwight and settled near
the old church in Ripley he had also 3 daughters, Clarissa wife of D Azro
NICHOLS, Mary Ann, widow of Charles D SACKETT, and Ellen wife of Marcus
GLEASON 
Hungerford, Olive (I30782)
 
46 Parker's Final Years

As he neared his sixth decade on the earth, Ely Parker's health began to deteriorate. His correspondence held confessions of chronic ailments, a growing sore on his foot, and a loss of feeling in his left arm. As the symptoms worsened, his friend Harriet Maxwell Converse urged him to see Dr. J.H. Salisbury -- the man who originated the Salisbury treatment, a high protein diet of pulped steak (cooked rare in patties) and rest in a particular type of hospital bed. Salisbury was also a former chemist who boasted a new diagnostic technique involving microscopic and chemical analysis of a patient's blood.

After examining Parker in 1890, Salisbury sent a note to Converse advising her of his diagnosis: "General Parker has diabetes. It is well you brought him here. I have requested him to come in and see me as a social patient without charge. Have given him a diet list and instructions for drinking and eating. Please help him along by encouragement all you can."

A short time later, Parker wrote to Converse, saying that he had seen little improvement. "Last week I was miserable and stayed at home nearly the whole week. It is all in the foot. The sore spot is constantly enlarging and of course, it is very painful. I am continuing the diet of beef and hot water. I see the Doctor often. He is very kind and good." Parker's foot would gradually improve, but it never completely healed, and soon other concerns took precedence. In 1893 he was diagnosed with Bright's disease, today known as glomerulonephritis, or kidney disease. Then he suffered a stroke. Despite feelings of pain and numbness, Parker insisted upon going in to work. Shortly after noon on July 11th, 1893, he lay down on a couch in his office and asked to have a doctor called. He was taken to a New York hospital, where he had three more mild strokes.

Parker never fully recovered. His left leg and arm were almost useless, and his invalid's pension of twelve dollars a month did little to offset rising medical bills. He began to auction off his possessions, at one time he even considered pawning his silver Red Jacket medal. His growing depression was evident in an 1894 letter to Harriet Maxwell Converse: "I am tired," the General wrote, "and care not how soon the end comes."

By 1895, Parker was barely able to walk, and even his famed penmanship was failing - yet through sheer determination, he reported once a week to Mulberry Street. On August 27th, his appearance was so alarming that the Police Department granted him a leave of absence. Three days later he died at the Fairfield home of his old friends Arthur and Josephine Brown. On August 30th, Parker announced simply that he was tired; he went to bed and died in his sleep. He was 67 years old.

Parker's funeral was held in Arthur Brown's parlor, and would unite representatives from the many worlds in which the Seneca Indian had walked: his society friends, military comrades, and representatives from the Haudenosaunee. Parker's body was laid out in full military uniform, and the service was Episcopalian - but Harriet Maxwell Converse would step forward to conduct the sacred Indian ceremony of "laying on the horns." A New York newspaper carried this account: "In former days the spreading horns of a deer were placed on the remains of dead sachems as a symbol of their authority, and removed at the grave, to be bestowed on the new sachem. Instead of the horns, Mrs. Converse used two strings of valued wampum beads, tied with a little piece of black ribbon.
*
*
Around the coffin sat six full-blooded Indians, silent and stern. The men uttered not a word from the time they entered the presence of the dead until the earth had fallen on his coffin. Just before the casket was closed at the house, an Indian pipe was placed inside of it, representing peace and friendship. Then over the bier was draped a great American flag."

A decade before his death, Ely Parker said he wanted his final resting place to be beside Red Jacket. In 1897, the Buffalo Historical Society fulfilled his wish; Parker was re-interred in Forest Lawn cemetery next to the grave of Sa-Go-Ye-Wat-Ha. The setting could not have been more appropriate: Forest Lawn had once been the site of the Granger farm, a Haudenosaunee trading post. Ely's mother Elizabeth, had seen that farm in her 1828 dream of prophecy: "She beheld a rainbow that reached from the reservation to the Granger farm, when it was suddenly broken in the middle of the sky." Do-Ne-Ho-Ga-Wa had returned home, fulfilling the last of his mother's dream of destiny. "His sun rose on Indian lands, and set on the white man's land. But the ancient earth of his people enfolded him in death."  
Parker, Col. Ely Samuel (I51858)
 
47 Passing of James Donald Sackett
Obituary Notice
«tab»He was 84 years, and passed away in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on January 11,2008.
He was the son of Mathew Dunham Jr. & Bertha Sackett. He married Lucille Dunkel on July 31, 1948. Survivors include: His wife, their children, eight grandchildren and a great- granddaughter. Also surviving is his brother Willis Sackett of Walker and his sister Dorothy "Sackett" Frank of Wyandotte, Michigan. - [Robert Sacket] 
Sackett, James Donald (I15763)
 
48 Phebe, b 19 Aug 1758 NHV, d Apr 1819 ć. 62 ColR ("Columbia Register" contemporary newspaper) - [Jacobus, p2017-8] Wooding, Phebe (I33049)
 
49 Sackett, Flora E., Southwick, 1872, v245, p37, Marriage
"1872 May 21, John W H Blood, of Worcester, 24, clerk, b. Charletown [sic], s. John B & Laverna Blood, first m., & Flora E Sackett, of Southwick, 23, b. Westfield, d. Loomis J & Cordelia Sackett, first m. Married by Timothy Lyman, Clergyman." (CRS) 
Family F22881
 
50 Sackett, Loomis I., Southwick, 1873, v254, p35, Marriage
"Oct 7, 1873, Loomis J Sackett, of Southwick, 50, farmer, b. Westfield Mass, s. Daniel & Trephena Sackett, second marriage, & Martha M Tupper, of Southwick, 37, b. Vermont, [parents blank], second marriage. Married by C M Perry, Minister." (CRS) 
Family F10858
 

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